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  • ‘Broken Heart’ Syndrome More Common in Women

    Broken heart syndrome - a temporary heart condition brought on by extreme physical or emotional stress - is far more likely to occur in women than in men.

  • 6 Vital Nutrients Women May Be Missing

    Here are nutrients that women are often deficient in, either because they lose too much of a nutrient, don't get enough of a nutrient, or both.

  • A Woman's Guide to Beating Heart Disease

    Surveys show fewer than one in 10 women perceive heart disease as their greatest health threat. But it's the nation's number one killer, and women are its prime target.

  • About Taxol

    Taxol, or paclitaxel, is a drug used for treating certain women who have advanced breast or ovarian cancer. Paclitaxel is a compound that is extracted from the bark of the Pacific yew tree.

  • Adjusting Your Attitude About Menopause

    Today's women understand that menopause is not a disease. It is a normal event; a passage from one stage of life to another.

  • Anal Cancer: Frequently Asked Questions

    Anal cancer is a rare cancer. Most people who get it are between the ages of 50 and 80. Slightly more women than men get anal cancer.

  • Anxiety a Concern for More Women

    Feeling anxious or nervous can at times lead to symptoms like a racing heartbeat, clenched muscles, upset stomach, and trouble sleeping. If you feel this way all too often, you could have an anxiety disorder. A recent review found women are more likely to struggle with this health problem.

  • Anxiety and Heart Disease: Women Take Note

    Women with an anxiety disorder may have symptoms that mask heart disease.

  • Assistance Programs Aid Breast Cancer Patients

    From time to time, we all need a helping hand. That’s even more the case if you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer. A patient assistance program may ease difficulties related to the disease. Unfortunately, many women don’t know about these services.

  • Asthma and Pregnancy

    With proper asthma management and good prenatal care, most women with asthma can have healthy pregnancies.

  • Autosomal Recessive Inheritance

    Autosomal inheritance of a gene means that the gene is located on one of the 22 pairs of chromosomes that are not the sex chromosomes. This means that boys and girls (or men and women) are equally likely to have the gene.

  • Baby Blues: Mood Swings or More Serious?

    For many women, the "baby blues" pass quickly. For others, the feelings of sadness don't ease and may become worse.

  • Beating an Eating Disorder

    Eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia have risen steadily to affect nearly 10 million women (and 1 million men).

  • Beyond Bone Health: The Power of Vitamin D

    A simple glass of milk can do a lot for your health. Thanks to the "Got Milk" campaign, many women know that it packs a healthy punch of calcium and vitamin D - two nutrients critical for strong bones. But did you know vitamin D may be beneficial beyond bone health? Ongoing research suggests it may have some truly potent powers.

  • Binge Drinking: A Woman’s Health Concern

    Many women drink alcohol - whether it's to celebrate a special event or maybe to relax with friends. An occasional drink usually isn't a concern. Moderate amounts of alcohol may even protect against coronary heart disease. More excessive drinking, though - like binge drinking - can lead to serious health problems.

  • Bone Health Isn’t Just a Woman’s Concern

    Many men may rank heart disease as a top health concern. Focused on their hearts, they may ignore or not realize how important bone health is, too. Osteoporosis-a disease that weakens and greatly increases the risk for bone fracture-affects almost 9 million men in the U.S. Even though the condition is more common in women, it may be more harmful in men.

  • Breast Cancer Drug May Increase Bone Loss

    A drug that can cut the risk for breast cancer has a serious down side: Aromasin appears to cause bone loss in postmenopausal women.

  • Breast Cancer May Be More Deadly for Some Women

    Breast cancer doesn't discriminate. Women of all ages, races, and ethnicities - men, too - can develop it. For some women, though - in particular, African-Americans - breast cancer can be more deadly. Many factors play a role in this disparity. Fortunately, by being proactive about breast health, women can help protect themselves from this disease.

  • Breast Cancer Quiz

    True or false: Most of the lumps women find when checking their breasts aren't cancerous.

  • Breast Cancer Quiz

    True or false: Most of the lumps women find when checking their breasts aren't cancerous.

  • Breast Cancer Risk Assessment

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women (other than skin cancer). The American Cancer Society reports the breast cancer death rate is declining, probably because of earlier detection and improved treatment. This short assessment will help you determine if you have major risk factors for breast cancer.

  • Breast Cancer Risk Assessment

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women (other than skin cancer). The American Cancer Society reports the breast cancer death rate is declining, probably because of earlier detection and improved treatment. This short assessment will help you determine if you have major risk factors for breast cancer.

  • Breast Cancer Risk Factors Clinical Wizard

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Experts don’t know the exact causes of breast cancer, but research has shown that certain factors increase a woman's chances of getting this disease. Although some women are at higher risk, the fact is, all women are at risk for breast cancer. Learn more by participating in our Breast Cancer Risk Factors Multimedia Interactive Program.

  • Breast Cancer Statistics

    Breast cancer ranks second among cancer deaths in women after lung cancer.

  • Breast Cancer: Introduction

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in women in the U.S. Once breast cancer occurs, cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body, making it life-threatening. The good news is that breast cancer is often found early, before it has spread.

  • Breast Cancer: Surgery

    Surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible is the primary treatment for breast cancer. Today, women have many surgical options and choices.

  • Breast Cancer: Symptoms

    Breast cancer often causes no symptoms in its early stages. Women with early breast cancer usually don’t have pain or notice any breast changes caused by the cancer. This is why routine screening tests are so important.

  • Breast Implants Have Limited Lifespan

    Women who get silicone-gel breast implants shouldn't be surprised if they need to have them removed a decade down the road, the FDA says.

  • Breast Implants May Hinder Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Plastic surgery is becoming more popular, with the most common procedure now breast augmentation, or enlargement. Contrary to what you may think, women with breast implants aren't immune to breast cancer. In fact, a recent study suggests they may be more likely to be diagnosed with later-stage disease.

  • Breast Pain: Should You Be Concerned?

    Many women contend with breast tenderness or pain. It’s common to have before your menstrual period. Clinically called mastalgia, breast pain usually isn’t a sign of something serious, such as breast cancer. Even more good news: You don’t have to live with it.

  • CA 125

    This test looks for the protein CA 125 in your blood. CA 125 is higher in many women with ovarian cancer.

  • Can Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields Cause Asthma?

    < Aug. 03, 2011 > -- Pregnant women exposed to high levels of electromagnetic fields - from power lines or electrical appliances - are more likely to have a child who later develops asthma.

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Women develop carpal tunnel syndrome three times more frequently than men. It usually occurs only in adults.

  • Certain Factors Help Predict Invasive Breast Cancer
  • Cervical Cancer Risk Assessment

    This assessment is valid for women between the ages of 21 and 69 who have had sexual intercourse at least once and who have not had a hysterectomy with removal of the cervix.

  • Cervical Cancer Risk Assessment

    This assessment is valid for women between the ages of 21 and 69 who have had sexual intercourse at least once and who have not had a hysterectomy with removal of the cervix.

  • Cervical Cancer: Diagnosis

    Many women don’t have symptoms of cervical cancer. Sometimes your doctor may first see signs of cancer during a pelvic exam or a Pap test.

  • Cervical Cancer: Introduction

    Cervical cancer develops from abnormal cells on the surface of the cervix that spread deeper or to other tissues or organs. This type of cancer occurs most often in women older than 40.

  • Cervical Cancer: Symptoms

    Women with precancer cells in their cervix rarely have symptoms. That’s why regular screening tests, such as the Pap test, are important.

  • Cesarean Doesn't Mean Forever

    Many women who have had cesarean births can attempt to deliver vaginally if no risk factors are present.

  • Chorioamnionitis

    Chorioamnionitis [chor-y-oh-am-nee-oh-NY-tis] is an infection of the placenta and the amniotic fluid. Only a few women get it, but, it is a common cause of preterm labor and delivery.

  • Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment

    Cancer of the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer) usually develops slowly, over several years. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Still, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping for the last 15 years because of better detection and treatment. Take this simple assessment to learn about your risks

  • Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment

    Cancer of the colon or rectum (colorectal cancer) usually develops slowly, over several years. Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Still, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping for the last 15 years because of better detection and treatment. Take this simple assessment to learn about your risks

  • Common Benign Lumps

    The two most common types of benign breast lumps are cysts and fibroadenomas. A cyst is a fluid-filled sac that develops in the breast tissue. Fibroadenomas are solid, smooth, firm, benign lumps that are most commonly found in women in their late teens and early 20s.

  • Considering Birth Control? Know Your Options

    Women today have more birth control options than ever before. The condom, the pill, the patch-to name just a few. In fact, more than three-quarters of sexually active women in the U.S. have tried at least three different methods of contraception. Knowing more about your options can help you choose the best one for you.

  • COPD: No Longer a Man’s Disease

    Wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing. Do these symptoms sound like asthma? They can actually be the warning signs of a much deadlier lung condition: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. Once considered a man’s disease, COPD is now a serious health burden for women.

  • Coping with Miscarriage

    A pregnancy ended by miscarriage can be a traumatic loss. Unfortunately, it’s one that many women experience. Knowing how to deal with your feelings and find support can help you cope during this difficult time.

  • Coronary Artery Disease Assessment

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. Determine your risk for developing CAD using this assessment tool.

  • Coronary Artery Disease Assessment

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. Determine your risk for developing CAD using this assessment tool.

  • C-Section Rate Reaches Record High in U.S.

    The number of women giving birth by cesarean section is at an all-time high, raising concern among doctors.

  • Cystic Fibrosis and the Reproductive System

    Detailed information on cystic fibrosis and its effect on the reproductive system for both men and women.

  • Cystocele

    When the wall between the bladder and the vagina weakens, the bladder may drop or sag into the vagina. This disorder in women is called cystocele.

  • Dads Aren’t Immune to Postpartum Depression

    Postpartum depression is a type of depression that can take hold after the birth of a child. It is much more common in women. Yet it may well strike upward of one-quarter of dads. A recent review looked at the latest research on the mood disorder to better explain how it affects men.

  • Diabetes Can Affect Hearing

    Diabetes complications can affect the eyes, kidneys, heart - and hearing. Women with poorly controlled diabetes may be at higher risk for hearing loss than those who keep their blood sugar well controlled.

  • Diabetes Detective: Examining the Evidence Animation

    Research tells us it’s possible to prevent or delay the development of diabetes. View the Diabetes Detective to discover the facts that everyone needs to know.

  • Diabetes Detective: Uncovering the Complications Animation

    Diabetes can affect vital organs such as the eyes, the heart and blood vessels, the kidneys, and the nerves. Research demonstrates that taking preventive action can slow progression of this disease. View Diabetes Detective: Uncovering the Complications to discover ways to positively affect your health.

  • Diabetes May Be Worse for Women

    Between men and women, diabetes doesn't always play fair. Both sexes are just as likely to develop the disease. But science shows that women may fare worse once they have it, particularly in terms of heart health.

  • Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (or DKA) is a serious condition that can happen to some people with diabetes. It happens when chemicals called “ketones” build up in your blood. Diabetic ketoacidosis is somewhat common. It is more common in younger people, and women experience it more often than men do.

  • Do Toxic Metals Lurk in Your Lipstick?

    Many women pucker up with shades like Ripened Red, Plum Luck, and Instant Mocha. Coloring the lips has been a beauty basic for centuries. A recent study, though, questions whether a daily dab of lipstick or gloss is a harmless habit.

  • Don’t Dismiss That Pap Test

    Cervical cancer can be a crafty disease. It can grow unnoticed in your body. The best way to outwit it is with a Pap test. This screening tool can find the disease early, when it’s easier to treat. Unfortunately, some women are still not taking advantage of it, says a recent report.

  • Don't Rule Out Adult-Onset Asthma

    Women are more likely than men to have asthma. Women also have more asthma attacks.

  • Dress for Success--and Your Health

    For women, ill-fitting, irritating, or otherwise inappropriate clothing and accessories could contribute to health issues ranging from back pain to crooked toes to eye infections.

  • Drinking Raises Risk for Breast Conditions

    Young women with a family history of breast cancer are at higher risk of developing other types of breast conditions if they also drink alcohol, a new study says.

  • Drop in HRT Use Tied to Fewer Mammograms

    Because of the health risks associated with hormone therapy, many women abandoned hormone drugs five to 10 years ago. Those same women now appear to be skipping their annual mammogram, according to a report in the journal Cancer.

  • Earlier Breast Cancer Diagnosis for Some Women

    Better screening may be one reason that women with BRCA mutations are being diagnosed with breast cancer earlier today than in previous generations. Another reason is that the mutation may trigger the cancer at an earlier age.

  • Easing Your Concerns About a Prostate Exam

    Visiting your doctor may not always be the most pleasant experience, especially if you need to have a digital rectal exam, or DRE. Like the Pap test for women, a DRE makes many men feel uncomfortable or embarrassed. Knowing more about this common procedure can ease your concerns and help you prepare for your first - or subsequent - DRE.

  • Endometrial Ablation

    Endometrial ablation is a procedure to remove a thin layer of tissue (endometrium) that lines the uterus. It is done to stop or reduce heavy menstrual bleeding. But it is only done on women who do not plan to have any children in the future.

  • Endometriosis Risk Assessment

    Endometriosis is a common condition among women. It affects about 1 in 10 women of childbearing age. Find out if you're at risk for it.

  • Exercise During Pregnancy

    There are benefits to getting regular exercise during pregnancy for most women. Work with your health care provider to develop a safe exercise program you can do throughout your pregnancy. This video discusses the benefits of exercise, as well as recommendations on how to exercise.

  • Exercise Your Way to a Healthy Pregnancy

    You don't have to give up exercising just because you're pregnant. Most women who become pregnant can follow a modified fitness program, with their doctor's approval.

  • Expanding the Screening Arsenal for Breast Cancer

    Until a cure is found, early detection remains the soundest strategy we have against breast cancer. The best tool at hand is mammography. It saves women's lives. But it's not perfect. As a result, scientists are developing other imaging tests to help spot breast cancer.

  • Feet First: Choosing the Right Footwear for the Job and Sports

    Both men and women should wear safety shoes and boots appropriate for the job and designed specifically to protect feet.

  • Female Urinary Incontinence Risk Assessment

    Urinary incontinence means that your urine leaks out at times when you are not using the bathroom. This is a common problem for women of all ages. Learn about the risk factors you may have for UI.

  • Fertility Options for Women with Ovarian Cancer
  • Few U.S. Moms Breastfeed as Planned

    < Jun. 06, 2012 > -- Most pregnant women say they plan to breastfeed their baby, but when it comes to actually doing so, fewer than a third of them met their breastfeeding goal of three months or more.

  • Fighting Breast Cancer: The Latest Treatment Techniques

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer today have more treatment options available to them than ever before. And scientists continue to make advancements. Coupled with better screening tests that help with diagnosis, newer treatments have helped to reduce the risk of dying from this disease over the last 30-plus years. Below are some of the latest ways doctors are bringing the fight to breast cancer.

  • First Trimester Fatigue

    For many women, the extreme tiredness of the first trimester is quite a surprise. And it’s an especially hard transition for those who are normally go-getters with lots of energy.

  • For Women: Take This Risk to Heart

    Women often perceive heart disease as an older person's disease that need not concern them until menopause.

  • For Young Women, What's Your Stroke Risk?

    Women who are obese or who have gained more than 44 pounds since they were 18 years old are about two-and-a-half times more likely to suffer an ischemic stroke than lean women who have not gained a lot of weight.

  • Free Androgen Index

    This test is used to find out whether your levels of the hormone androgen are normal. The levels are different for men and women.

  • Frequently Asked Questions About Ovarian Cancer

    Here are some answers to questions women often have about ovarian cancer.

  • Frequently Asked Questions: Mammograms

    Timing your mammogram when your breasts are not tender is important. In premenopausal women, this is usually 1 week after a menstrual period.

  • Glossary - Women's Health

    Glossary of terms relating to women's health

  • Good News for Breast Cancer Detection and Care

    More women are surviving breast cancer because the disease is being detected earlier.

  • Group B Streptococcus Infection in Newborns

    Group B streptococcus (strep) is a type of bacteria. It can be found in the digestive tract, urinary tract, and genital area of adults. About 1 in 4 pregnant women carry GBS in their rectum or vagina. During pregnancy, the mother can pass the infection to the baby. The fetus can get GBS during pregnancy. Newborns can get it from the mother's genital tract during delivery.

  • Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow

    Half of Americans experience some degree of hair loss. Hair loss affects both men and women, but with different results.

  • Having a Baby? Get Screened for Diabetes

    If you are a mother-to-be, your health is central to your baby’s well-being. Gestational diabetes can threaten this vital connection. It can cause trouble with delivery, premature birth, and other serious problems. That’s why health experts recommend that all pregnant women be screened for the disease.

  • Health Promotion and Prevention

    Detailed information on health promotion and disease prevention for women, including information on breast health, breast cancer prevention, breast self-examination, mammography, birth control, pap test, preconception care, heart disease prevention, safer

  • Heart Attacks and Women

    For many women, a heart attack may feel like a strange discomfort in the back or some other easily ignored sign, instead of crushing chest pain.

  • Heart Disease Risk Factors Clinical Wizard

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in men and women in the United States. Research has found that the risk of developing heart disease not only increases with the number of risk factors, but also with the level of severity of each risk factor. One of the ways you can help prevent heart disease is by knowing your risk factors. Learn more by participating in our Heart Disease Risk Factors Multimedia Interactive Program.

  • Heart Quiz for Women Only

    As a woman, do you know what your risk is for developing heart disease? You might be surprised. Take this quiz, based on information from the American Heart Association, and see how much you know about heart disease in women.

  • Heart Quiz for Women Only

    As a woman, do you know what your risk is for developing heart disease? You might be surprised. Take this quiz, based on information from the American Heart Association, and see how much you know about heart disease in women.

  • Hemorrhoids and Varicose Veins in Pregnancy

    Hemorrhoids and varicose veins might seem to be two different, unrelated problems, but they are actually quite similar. And, many women, especially those in the third trimester of pregnancy, have them.

  • Herpes

    It is important that women avoid contracting herpes during pregnancy, because a first episode during pregnancy creates a greater risk of transmission to the newborn.

  • High Heels: Fashion Footwear or Safety Hazard?

    High-heeled shoes are a fashion staple for many women. But they may not be the safest footwear to step out in, according to a recent study.

  • Hip Fracture

    A hip fracture is a break in the thigh bone (femur) of your hip joint. The majority happen to people older than 60 years of age, and women get more hip fractures than men.

  • Home Page - Women's Health

    Detailed information on healthcare for women, including information on breast health, colorectal cancer, diabetes, gynecological concerns, heart attack, hysterectomy, infertility, menopause, mental health, osteoporosis, skin cancer, and urinary conditions

  • Hot Flashes: You Don’t Have to Take the Heat

    A sudden rush of heat across your face and upper body, followed by a rapid heartbeat, sweating, even chills—these are likely the signs of a hot flash. It’s the chief complaint for many women approaching menopause. The latest treatment options can help you manage these bothersome symptoms.

  • How Can Diabetes Affect Bladder Control?

    Over time, diabetes can damage the nerves that control the bladder. In both men and women, this can lead to overactive bladder.

  • How Women Can Avoid Midlife Weight Gain

    Whether you’ve already gained a few extra pounds or have yet to reach perimenopause, here are strategies to help you maintain a healthy weight in midlife and beyond.

  • HPV Test Better Predictor for Long-Term Cancer Risk

    < Aug. 01, 2012 > -- The human papillomavirus (HPV) test may be better at helping women know their long-term risk for cervical cancer than the more traditional Pap test - but both tests are still important, new research says.

  • HPV Vaccine for Boys

    Two HPV vaccines can protect against certain types of HPV. At first, they were recommended for girls and young women, but one of the vaccines has also been approved for use in boys and young men.

  • Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Many pregnant women have some nausea and sometimes vomiting in the first trimester. A few pregnant women have a severe kind of nausea and vomiting called hyperemesis gravidarum. These women often lose weight, and get dehydrated. They may also have changes in the body's chemical processes.

  • Infertility Risk Factors for Men and Women

    Age, chronic diseases, and endometriosis are common factors for women. For men, they are STDs, toxic substances at work, and cigarette smoking.

  • Is Asthma Worse for Women?

    Asthma is a thief. It steals the breath away from more than 25 million Americans. Women are especially likely to have this chronic lung disease. And they may struggle more with asthma problems, so suggests a recent study.

  • Is It Safe to Buy Breast Milk Online?

    Breast milk is best for babies. But not all mothers may make enough milk or be able to breastfeed their child. These women may turn to the internet to buy breast milk. A recent study found that may not be the safest option.

  • Kidney Stones: A Painful Reality for More Women

    Kidney stones are becoming a painful reality for more people. In a recent survey, nearly twice as many people reported having one, compared with the results of a similar 1994 survey. Women may be especially feeling the uptick.

  • Knee Pain

    Knee pain is very common, especially in highly active people who put a lot of pressure on their knees, like runners. It affects women more often than men. It also affects teens and younger adults more often than older adults.

  • Knees Are Casualties of Women's Sports

    Active women are at least twice as likely to suffer serious knee injuries as men, but it's not just athletes who are at risk.

  • Laborists: Specialists in Labor and Delivery

    During labor, you and your doctor may decide to turn to a laborist—an OB/GYN who works on site at the hospital and specializes in caring for women in labor.

  • Learn About Gestational Diabetes

    Gestational diabetes does not cause birth defects. Most women with gestational diabetes have healthy, full-term babies.

  • Lichen Sclerosus

    Lichen sclerosus is a long-term skin condition. It causes the skin to become thin, white, and wrinkly. Lichen sclerosus is most common in women who have gone through menopause. It can also happen in men and children, and women who have not gone through menopause.

  • Life After Cancer: Changes in a Woman’s Sex Life

    Many women have changes in their sex life after cancer treatment. You may have both physical and emotional side effects.

  • Low T? Know the Risks of Testosterone Treatment

    Hormones hold a lot of sway in the human body. And not just in women. A drop in the hormone testosterone can spur unsettling symptoms in men. Low T-as it's called-has more men seeking testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), despite the risks.

  • Lupus and Pregnancy

    Many women with lupus give birth to healthy children. The key to a successful pregnancy is know how lupus affects your body.

  • Mammogram

    A mammogram is way to look at your breast using X-rays. It is used to find and diagnose breast disease in women. Your healthcare provider may order a mammogram if you have a breast problem such as a lump, pain, or discharge from a nipple. Your provider may also order one as a screening test. The test can look for breast cancers, benign tumors, and cysts before they can be felt.

  • Managing Adult Acne

    Shifting hormone levels make women prone to breakouts. This is especially true if you have ovarian cysts, are pregnant or are starting or stopping birth control pills.

  • Managing Midlife Weight Gain

    Between the late 30s and late 40s, it's not uncommon for both men and women to gain 10 pounds.

  • Many Doctors Still Urging Yearly Pap Tests

    Although national health guidelines say that some women can safely stretch the time between Pap test to three years, many doctors haven't gotten the message.

  • Maternal and Fetal Infections

    In pregnancy, infections are a common complication—but women may not have obvious symptoms, or they may show different symptoms of an infection.

  • Maternal and Fetal Testing

    Women with high-risk pregnancies often need a close watch for potential problems or complications. Many tests and procedures are available to monitor the health of both mother and baby.

  • Maternal Nutrition and Breastfeeding

    Women who are breastfeeding should eat a well-balanced, varied diet and drink enough liquids.

  • Maternity Leave

    The length of time given for a paid maternity leave of absence varies among companies. Some women extend their maternity leaves by taking additional weeks of unpaid leave.

  • Medical Conditions and Pregnancy

    With proper medical care, most women can enjoy a healthy pregnancy, even with medical challenges, like diabetes or high blood pressure.

  • Men and Mental Illness

    Mental illness can cause different symptoms in men than in women, so some disorders in men may be harder to recognize. Men who are depressed, for example, may appear angry and irritable rather than sad and withdrawn.

  • Men and Mental Illness

    Mental illness can cause different symptoms in men than in women, so some disorders in men may be harder to recognize. Men who are depressed, for example, may appear angry and irritable rather than sad and withdrawn.

  • Men and Mental Illness

    Mental illness can cause different symptoms in men than in women, so some disorders in men may be harder to recognize. Men who are depressed, for example, may appear angry and irritable rather than sad and withdrawn.

  • Men and Mental Illness

    Mental illness can cause different symptoms in men than in women, so some disorders in men may be harder to recognize. Men who are depressed, for example, may appear angry and irritable rather than sad and withdrawn.

  • Men at Risk for Knee Cartilage Damage

    Although women are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), men with an ACL injury are more likely to develop a hole in their cartilage after surgical repair.

  • Men May Show Depression Differently

    Depression can weigh down anyone. Compared with women, though, fewer men are diagnosed with this common mental health condition. Why? A recent study says it may be partly because men show depression differently.

  • Menopause

    Menopause marks the end of a woman's menstrual periods. Menopause officially begins one year after your periods have stopped completely. This video explains what occurs in the time leading up to menopause and what can be done to relieve symptoms such as hot flashes.

  • Mental Health

    Detailed information on mental health and women, including information on managing stress, depression, and domestic violence

  • Migraine Headaches During Pregnancy

    Many women have migraine headaches while pregnant. The good news is that you don’t have to give in to the pain when it strikes. Know what pain-relief options are safest for you.

  • Migraines and Endometriosis

    Women who have endometriosis may also be more likely to have migraines, according to a recent Italian study.

  • Migraines: A Monthly Misery?

    Women who experience migraines around the start of their period may be able to prevent them.

  • Moderate Drinking May Offer Benefits to Women

    Middle-aged women who drink moderate amounts of alcohol may end up in better physical and mental health in old age than women who don't drink.

  • More Women Are Dying From Prescription Painkillers

    Taking prescription painkillers like Vicodin and Oxycontin may not seem like a life-threatening act. After all, you can obtain them through your doctor. But if you don’t use these medications properly, they can be deadly. More women, in particular, are overdosing on these drugs.

  • More Women Are Using Hormone Therapy

    A woman’s body goes through many changes during menopause. Changing hormone levels can cause problems such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and night sweats. A recent study suggests more women may be trying bioidentical hormones to ease these symptoms. But they may not know exactly what they are taking.

  • More Women Face Mental Illness

    You may pay more attention to your physical health than how you feel mentally. Like any physical ailment, though, conditions such as depression, anxiety, and substance abuse can tax your body. More than 45 million Americans struggle with a mental health problem, and many of them are women. Knowing more about mental illness, including the warning signs, can help keep your body - and mind - healthy.

  • Multiple Births Quiz

    Today, more women than ever before are giving birth to multiples. What explains the increase in through the past decade? Take this quiz to find out.

  • Multiple Births Quiz

    Today, more women than ever before are giving birth to multiples. What explains the increase in through the past decade? Take this quiz to find out.

  • Nipple Problems and Discharge

    Nipple conditions are a common benign breast condition affecting many women. Some problems are related to lactation, and others are not.

  • No Memory Boost with Hormone Therapy

    Researchers found that using estrogen after menopause did not improve memory. It did not matter when women took the estrogen or for how long.

  • Not All Breast Cancers Are the Same

    All breast cancers have this in common: They begin in breast tissue. Beyond that, they aren’t all the same. Doctors use these differences to decide on the most effective treatment plan for women diagnosed with the disease.

  • Older Moms, Healthy Babies

    The fact is that most women in their 30s and 40s have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. To ensure a healthy pregnancy, you should do what any woman should do: Prepare for your baby with healthy lifestyle choices. Talk with your doctor about your risk factors and learn what you can do to prevent potential problems.

  • Online Resources - Women's Health

    List of online resources to find additional information on women's health

  • Ovarian Cyst

    An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that forms on or inside an ovary. Most women will not need treatment. In some cases, you may need surgery to remove part or all of your ovary.

  • Ovarian Cysts

    An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that forms on or in the ovary. Most cysts are harmless and don't cause any symptoms. In this video, you'll learn about different types of ovarian cysts and what treatment may be recommended if you have one.

  • Pain Quiz

    What's the most sensitive part of your body? Are women less sensitive to pain than men? Does everyone feel pain? Get answers to these and other questions by taking the pain quiz.

  • Pain Quiz

    What's the most sensitive part of your body? Are women less sensitive to pain than men? Does everyone feel pain? Get answers to these and other questions by taking the pain quiz.

  • Panel Confirms Risks of Hormone Therapy

    < May. 30, 2012 > -- After looking at more than a decade's worth of studies on hormone therapy, an expert panel says that women shouldn't take estrogen or progestin to help prevent disease.

  • Pap Tests for Older Women

    Older women still need health checkups and screening tests, including regular gynecological exams.

  • Periods, Pregnancy, Menopause—And Sleep

    Researchers aren't sure why women seem to have more trouble sleeping than men, but they have noticed that women have the most difficulty when hormone levels fluctuate.

  • Podcast: Beyond Bone Health: The Power of Vitamin D

    A simple glass of milk can do a lot for your health. Thanks to the "Got Milk" campaign, many women know that it packs a healthy punch of calcium and vitamin D – two nutrients critical for strong bones.

  • Podcast: Binge Drinking: A Woman’s Health Concern

    Many women drink alcohol – whether it’s to celebrate a special event or maybe to relax with friends. An occasional drink usually isn’t a concern. Moderate amounts of alcohol may even protect against coronary heart disease.

  • Podcast: Breast Cancer Drug May Increase Bone Loss

    A drug that can cut the risk for breast cancer has a serious down side: Aromasin appears to cause bone loss in postmenopausal women.

  • Podcast: Breast Cancer May Be More Deadly for Some Women

    Breast cancer doesn’t discriminate. Women of all ages, races, and ethnicities – men, too – can develop it. For some women, though – in particular, African-Americans – breast cancer can be more deadly. Many factors play a role in this disparity.

  • Podcast: Breast Implants Have Limited Lifespan

    Women who get silicone-gel breast implants shouldn’t be surprised if they need to have them removed a decade down the road, the FDA says.

  • Podcast: Breast Implants May Hinder Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Plastic surgery is becoming more popular, with the most common procedure now breast augmentation, or enlargement. Contrary to what you may think, women with breast implants aren't immune to breast cancer.

  • Podcast: 'Broken Heart' Syndrome More Common in Women

    Broken heart syndrome – a temporary heart condition brought on by extreme physical or emotional stress – is far more likely to occur in women than in men.

  • Podcast: Considering Birth Control? Know Your Options

    Women today have more birth control options than ever before. The condom, the pill, the patch—to name just a few. In fact, more than three-quarters of sexually active women in the U.S. have tried at least three different methods of contraception.

  • Podcast: C-Section Rate Reaches Record High in U.S.

    The number of women giving birth by cesarean section is at an all-time high, raising concern among doctors.

  • Podcast: Diabetes Can Affect Hearing

    Diabetes complications can affect the eyes, kidneys, heart – and hearing. Women with poorly controlled diabetes may be at higher risk for hearing loss than those who keep their blood sugar well controlled.

  • Podcast: Do Larger Infants Raise Breast Cancer Risk?

    Women who give birth to large infants may be 2.5 times more likely to develop breast cancer than women who give birth to the smallest babies.

  • Podcast: Do Toxic Metals Lurk in Your Lipstick?

    Many women pucker up with shades like Ripened Red, Plum Luck, and Instant Mocha. Coloring the lips has been a beauty basic for centuries. A recent study, though, questions whether a daily dab of lipstick or gloss is a harmless habit.

  • Podcast: Drinking Raises Risk for Breast Conditions

    Women with a family history of breast cancer are at higher risk of developing other types of breast conditions if they also drink alcohol.

  • Podcast: Drop in HRT Use Tied to Fewer Mammograms

    Because of the health risks associated with hormone therapy, many women abandoned hormone drugs five to 10 years ago. Those same women now appear to be skipping their annual mammogram.

  • Podcast: Earlier Breast Cancer Diagnosis for Some Women

    Better screening may be one reason that women with BRCA mutations are being diagnosed with breast cancer earlier today than in previous generations. Another reason is that the mutation may trigger the cancer at an earlier age.

  • Podcast: Easing Your Concerns About a Prostate Exam

    Visiting your doctor may not always be the most pleasant experience, especially if you need to have a digital rectal exam, or DRE. Like the Pap test for women, a DRE makes many men feel uncomfortable or embarrassed.

  • Podcast: Fighting Breast Cancer: The Latest Treatment Techniques

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer today have more treatment options available to them than ever before. And scientists continue to make advancements.

  • Podcast: Hormone Combo in Contraception Boosts Heart Risk

    Women who use birth control products that contain a combination of estrogen and progestin may double their risk for heart attack and stroke.

  • Podcast: Many Doctors Still Urging Yearly Pap Tests

    Although national health guidelines say that some women can safely stretch their Pap test to every three years, many doctors haven’t gotten the message.

  • Podcast: Men at Risk for Knee Cartilage Damage

    Although women are more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), men with an ACL injury are more likely to develop a hole in their cartilage after surgical repair.

  • Podcast: Mixed Reviews on Alcohol Use by Women

    Alcohol can be both a benefit and a danger to women, according to two recent studies. The key seems to be in knowing when it’s appropriate to drink and how much alcohol is considered safe.

  • Podcast: Moderate Drinking May Offer Benefits to Women

    Middle-aged women who drink moderate amounts of alcohol may end up in better physical and mental health in old age than women who don’t drink.

  • Podcast: Panel Nixes Supplements for Bone Health

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) says that older women should not take low doses of calcium and vitamin D supplements to help prevent fractures. The panel is still weighing what to recommend on higher supplement doses.

  • Podcast: Sleep Apnea Affects Men, Women Equally

    Women with sleep apnea face an increased risk for heart problems, just as men with this condition do. But just as for men, women who are treated with CPAP appear to bring their risk down.

  • Podcast: Smoggy Air Fogs the Brain

    Women who spend most of their life breathing air pollution are more likely to have a decline in mental functioning as they age, a new study says.

  • Podcast: Smoking Speeds Men’s Mental Decline

    Men who smoke in middle age have a more rapid decline in memory, learning, and thinking than women who smoke. And the effects linger even after men quit smoking.

  • Podcast: Strong Social Ties May Help Women Survive Cancer

    Learning you have breast cancer can be overwhelming. Many women face hard decisions about their care. A new study indicates that having a strong social network may help women better cope with a breast cancer diagnosis.

  • Podcast: Study Confirms Longer Time OK Between Pap Tests

    Women 30 and older who have normal results on two previous Pap tests can wait three years before their next one.

  • Podcast: Women in Their 40s Need Annual Mammogram

    The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has released new guidelines for mammography that call for annual mammograms for all women, beginning at age 40.

  • Podcast: Women Quit Breast Cancer Drugs Over Side Effects

    Drugs that help prevent the recurrence of breast cancer can cause such unpleasant side effects that many women stop taking them.

  • Podcast: Younger Women Need to Be Vigilant About Breast Cancer

    As you grow older, your chance of developing breast cancer increases. In fact, two-thirds of cases occur in women ages 55 and older. Still, younger women can develop the disease.

  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    PCOS is a common hormone problem in women of childbearing age. Women with PCOS may not ovulate, and have abnormal hormone levels. They may experience missed or irregular periods, excess hair growth and weight gain around the belly.

  • Post-Mastectomy

    Detailed information for women following a mastectomy, including breast reconstruction, lymphedema prevention, and breast prosthesis

  • Postpartum Depression May Be More Common Than Thought

    Many women find the few weeks following birth rife with emotions—otherwise known as the baby blues. For some, these feelings can plummet into postpartum depression, a condition that may be more common than previously thought.

  • Postpartum Hemorrhage

    Postpartum hemorrhage is more bleeding than normal after the birth of a baby. About 1 in 100 to 5 in 100 women have postpartum hemorrhage. It is more likely with a cesarean birth. It most often happens after the placenta is delivered, but it can also happen later.

  • Postpartum Thyroiditis

    Postpartum thyroiditis happens when a woman’s thyroid becomes inflamed after having a baby. It may first cause your thyroid to be overactive (hyperthyroidism). But in time it leads to an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). A small percentage of pregnant women get this health problem.

  • Post-Term Pregnancy

    A pregnancy that lasts more than 42 weeks is called post-term. A pregnancy that is between 41 and 42 weeks is called late-term. Most women deliver between 37 and 42 weeks of pregnancy.

  • Pregnancy and Heartburn

    Chances are good that you’re one of more than many pregnant women who experience the churning and burning of heartburn or acid indigestion. It typically hits somewhere in the second or third trimester, and it can be miserable.

  • Pregnancy and Skin Changes

    For many women, pregnancy brings glowing skin, rosy cheeks, and shiny hair. But others can experience skin changes that aren’t so attractive, including acne, dark spots, and stretch marks.

  • Pregnancy Over Age 30

    Many women today are waiting until later in life to have children. In the United States, birth rates for women in their 30s are at the highest levels in four decades.

  • Pregnant? Watch Your Weight Gain

    Eating for two doesn’t mean you need to eat twice as much. When you are pregnant, you should keep an eye on your weight. But many women are gaining too many pounds during pregnancy, says a recent government report. That can lead to many health woes for mom and baby.

  • Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD)

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a much more severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It may affect women who are able to get pregnant. It’s a severe and chronic medical condition that requires attention and treatment. Lifestyle changes and sometimes medications can help manage symptoms.

  • Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a group of emotional and physical symptoms many women have in the days before their period starts. Lifestyle changes and sometimes medicines can help manage symptoms.

  • Preventing Stroke in Women

    A stroke can strike anyone—no matter your age, ethnicity, or sex. There is no typical stroke victim. Yet women are slightly more likely than men to have a stroke and die from it. These troubling facts recently led health experts to compile the first female-focused guidelines for stroke prevention.

  • Protect You and Your Baby This Flu Season

    The flu can be a serious illness. That’s especially true for mothers-to-be. Pregnant women are more likely to end up in the hospital because of the flu. It can cause problems for both mother and baby. As a result, health experts urge all pregnant women to get a flu shot.

  • Protect Yourself from Sexual Assault

    Rape can happen to anyone—children, grandmothers, students, working women, wives, mothers, and even males.

  • PTSD Not Uncommon After Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    A traumatic event, such as a natural disaster or a severe car accident, can trigger feelings of anxiety and distress-maybe even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). So, too, can a breast cancer diagnosis. Recent research shows that approximately 25 percent of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer may suffer from PTSD. Learning good coping strategies can help you deal with such life-altering news.

  • Screening for Heart Disease in Women

    < Mar. 28, 2012 > -- Women at risk for heart disease don't always realize it, and a new study suggests the perfect person to help assess that risk: the OB/GYN.

  • Sexual Harassment's Emotional Toll

    According to researchers at the American Psychological Association, nearly 50 percent of American working women will experience on-the-job sexual harassment at some point in their careers.

  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    Women suffer more frequent and severe symptoms from STDs. Some STDs can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, which can lead to both infertility and ectopic pregnancy.

  • Should You Be Tested for the Breast Cancer Gene?

    Your genes are like an encyclopedia. They contain valuable information about you—for example, your eye color, height, or skin tone. They can also determine your risk for certain diseases, including breast cancer. Genetic testing may help some women take action against this potential health concern. Is it right for you?

  • Should You Consider Preventive Drugs for Breast Cancer?

    All women have at least some risk for breast cancer. But some are more likely than others to eventually develop the disease. Health organizations urge these high-risk women to talk with their doctor about chemoprevention. Certain drugs may actually be able to help ward off breast cancer.

  • Should You Have a Hysterectomy?

    Maybe you have constant pelvic pain. Or you suffer from heavy bleeding from the uterus. For these symptoms and others, a hysterectomy may help. But this major surgery isn’t without risks. What’s more, many women who have a hysterectomy may not need one, suggests a recent finding.

  • Sleep Apnea Affects Men, Women Equally

    Women with sleep apnea face an increased risk for heart problems, just as men with this condition do. But just as for men, women who are treated with CPAP appear to bring their risk down.

  • Smart Choices: Eating Healthy at Any Age

    At every stage of life, healthful eating fuels health and fitness.

  • Smart Shopping for Women
  • Smoggy Air Fogs the Brain

    Women who spend most of their life breathing air pollution are more likely to have a decline in mental functioning as they age, a new study says.

  • Smoking Speeds Men’s Mental Decline

    Men who smoke in middle age have a more rapid decline in memory, learning, and thinking than women who smoke. And the effects linger even after men quit smoking.

  • Solving the Breast Cancer Puzzle

    Investigators report headway against breast cancer, the disease that worries women more than any other.

  • Steps Women Can Take to Reduce Their Diabetes Risk

    Type 2 diabetes can be especially deadly for women. Of the nearly 16 million Americans with diabetes, more than half are female.

  • Study Confirms Longer Time OK Between Pap Tests

    Women 30 and older who have normal results on two previous Pap tests can wait three years before their next one.

  • Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR)

    STAR was a clinical trial of the drug raloxifene that included more than 19,000 postmenopausal women at increased risk for breast cancer. The results showed that raloxifene worked as well as tamoxifen at reducing breast cancer risk.

  • Study: Better Method Needed to Assess Body Fat

    < Apr. 04, 2012 > -- Women who calculate their body mass index (BMI) to figure out if they are obese may be missing the mark.

  • Study: Better Method Needed to Assess Body Fat

    < Apr. 04, 2012 > -- Women who calculate their body mass index (BMI) to figure out if they are obese may be missing the mark.

  • Study: Better Method Needed to Assess Body Fat

    < Apr. 04, 2012 > -- Women who calculate their body mass index (BMI) to figure out if they are obese may be missing the mark.

  • Study: Better Method Needed to Assess Body Fat

    < Apr. 04, 2012 > -- Women who calculate their body mass index (BMI) to figure out if they are obese may be missing the mark.

  • Study: Better Method Needed to Assess Body Fat

    < Apr. 04, 2012 > -- Women who calculate their body mass index (BMI) to figure out if they are obese may be missing the mark.

  • Takayasu's Arteritis

    Takayasu's arteritis is an autoimmune disease. It causes inflammation of the large arteries. It’s a rare disease that’s most common in women and people of Asian descent.

  • The Dangers of Binge Drinking

    Too many young people are participating in a dangerous practice called binge drinking, or drinking to intoxication. It's defined as having 5 or more drinks in a row for men; for women, it’s 4-plus drinks in a row.

  • The Facts About Fibroids

    Fibroid tumors may sound like a serious condition, but for many women who have them, they're just a fact of life.

  • Think About Your Drink

    Feeling parched is usually the first reason we reach for a glass. Women need at least three quarts of water a day and men need about four quarts a day to replenish water used for vital functions.

  • Thyroid Disorders in Women

    Detailed information on thyroid disorders and how they affect women, including puberty, pregnancy, and menopause.

  • Thyroid Trouble Is Tough to Pin Down

    What causes thyroid disorders, and why do they strike women five to eight times more often than men? The answers aren't clear.

  • Topic Index - Women's Health

    Detailed information on healthcare for women, including information on breast health, colorectal cancer, diabetes, gynecological concerns, heart attack, hysterectomy, infertility, menopause, mental health, osteoporosis, skin cancer, and urinary conditions

  • Total Testosterone

    This test measures the level of testosterone in your blood. Both men and women produce this hormone.

  • Treating UTIs: Antibiotics May Not Be Necessary

    Many women are familiar with the unpleasant signs of a urinary tract infection, or UTI. A constant urge to go. A burning sensation when using the bathroom. These symptoms and others often send women to their doctor for treatment. The usual remedy: antibiotics-although a recent study suggests they may not always be needed.

  • Understanding Repeated Pregnancy Loss

    In the past, a woman who miscarried several times might never know why it happened. Today, more and more women are finding out the causes of their recurrent miscarriages.

  • Urinary Conditions

    Detailed information on the most common urinary conditions for women, including urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, and interstitial cystitis

  • Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are infections in any part of the urinary tract. They are a common health problem that affects millions of people each year. Women are especially prone to UTIs.

  • Vaginal Cancer: Frequently Asked Questions

    Most women diagnosed with vaginal cancer are older than 60. It rarely occurs in women younger than 40.

  • Vaginitis

    Vaginitis is a common problem for women of all ages. Bacteria, yeast, viruses, and chemicals in creams or sprays can cause it.

  • Vaginitis in Adolescents

    Vaginitis is a common problem for women of all ages. Bacteria, yeast, viruses, and chemicals in creams or sprays can cause it.

  • Vulvar Cancer: Symptoms

    You can have vulvar cancer without having any symptoms. But some women do have symptoms. Learn what symptoms the cancer can cause.

  • Want to Get Pregnant? Follow the 90-Day Guide

    At least 90 days before starting to try to conceive, both men and women should take steps to improve their diet and exercise routines, as well as fine-tune any medications they may be taking.

  • Weight Gain During Pregnancy

    Average weight gain for women is between 25 and 35 pounds, although slight deviations from this may also be considered normal.

  • Weight Training for Women

    Misconceptions about weight training -- often based on unfounded fears of becoming too muscular -- can keep women from pushing their fitness levels.

  • What You Need to Know About AIDS

    Homosexuals and heterosexuals alike are at risk. Infected people can pass HIV on to anyone with whom they have intimate contact. Men can infect female or male partners, as can women.

  • What You Need to Know About Uterine Fibroids

    Uterine fibroids are a common condition. Some research suggests up to 8 out of 10 women may have these noncancerous tumors. Many don’t know it, though, because they may never have any symptoms. For those who do, timely treatment can restore a woman’s well-being.

  • When the Immune System Chooses the Wrong Target

    Doctors divide autoimmune diseases in two categories: Those that attack a specific organ and those that target many organs.

  • When to Get a Colorectal Cancer Check

    All women and men at average risk for colorectal cancer should have a screening test for colorectal cancer beginning at age 50. People who are at higher risk for colorectal cancer may need to begin screening tests at an younger age.

  • Why Breast Density Matters

    Certain factors can raise your risk for breast cancer. Some you probably already know about, such as age and a family history of the disease. But what about breast density? Research shows that not all women have a clear understanding of breast density and its connection to breast cancer. Read on to learn more about this lesser-known risk factor.

  • Women and Heart Disease: Sometimes a Difficult Diagnosis

    Heart disease trumps all other diseases, including cancer, as the number one cause of death for American women. Partly, that's because women may suffer from less recognized heart attack symptoms. The condition may also affect a woman's body differently, making it harder to diagnose. Read on to learn more about the dangers of heart disease.

  • Women in Their 40s Need Annual Mammogram

    The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has released new guidelines for mammography that call for annual mammograms for all women, beginning at age 40.

  • Women Quit Breast Cancer Drugs Over Side Effects

    Drugs that help prevent the recurrence of breast cancer can cause such unpleasant side effects that many women stop taking them.

  • Women with Asthma Can Have Healthy Babies

    Pregnant women with asthma are just as likely to have healthy, normal babies as women without asthma -- as long as their disease is kept under control.

  • Women, Alcohol, and Drugs: The Risks Are Higher

    As a woman, your body is much more sensitive to the effects of alcohol and more easily damaged than a man’s body. Because women have less water in their body than men, alcohol doesn't dilute as much and more of it gets absorbed into the blood. That’s why women suffer greater physical damage and often become more intoxicated than men when they drink identical amounts of alcohol.

  • Women's Guide to Staying Healthy

    Women can't always stay healthy and prevent disease. But by having certain screening tests and practicing healthful behaviors, they are more likely to live long, healthy lives.

  • Work and Pregnancy

    Most women are able to work safely, in some cases, until the day of delivery, depending on the type of work performed and their condition.

  • Working Mom? Aim for Less Stress

    In the United States, 78 percent of all mothers with kids ages 6 to 17 work in paid jobs. Most—including married working moms—also are responsible for child care and housework.

  • You Don’t Have to Live with a Leaky Bladder

    It might happen when you sneeze—or maybe when you exercise. It might happen so fast you aren’t able to make it to the bathroom. Living with a leaky bladder—or urinary incontinence—can be frustrating at the very least. The American College of Physicians (ACP) recently looked at some of the best ways—other than surgery—to help women with this condition.

  • Younger Women Need to Be Vigilant About Breast Cancer

    As you grow older, your chance of developing breast cancer increases. In fact, two-thirds of cases occur in women ages 55 and older. Still, younger women can develop the disease. And a recent study found that more of them-particularly those younger than 40-are being diagnosed with breast cancer that has spread throughout the body.