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LGBTQ affirming care

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The better we know you, the better we can care for you

Each of us is unique, and so are our needs when it comes to healthcare. Our goal is to provide the level of care you need as an individual. This includes caring for the LGBTQ community, as a part of our commitment to diversity, inclusion and equity.


To get started, look for our LGBTQ care symbol when you search online for a Novant Health care provider. Choosing a provider is the first step in getting access to the medical services you need.

Tell Us More

When creating your medical record, many organizations ask for basics such as your sex, age and medical history. That’s a start but sometimes not enough to meet our goal of providing remarkable healthcare. That’s why we’re asking you to tell us more, particularly if you identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer/questioning (LGBTQ). The better we know you, the easier it is to offer you the care you need and deserve.

By collecting information about your sexual orientation and gender identity, we’re making healthcare more personal. This information helps your caregiver offer appropriate health screenings and assessments, arrive at an accurate diagnosis and recommend effective treatment. Knowing how you identify also helps us provide care that is more compassionate.

Our commitment to health equity helps ensure patients, families, communities and team members high-quality care and services when and where they need them. In addition to asking about your sexual orientation and gender identity, we will also ask about your preferred language, race and ethnicity, military status and religion. Not comfortable sharing? That’s okay, too. Protecting your privacy is a priority. As with other health information, details shared will be kept confidential.

Frequently Asked Questions


As with your other health information, any information shared will be kept confidential. Your care team and Novant Health are bound by laws and policies to keep your information private. If you are under 18, there are certain situations in which your parents can have access to this information in your medical record. You can also ask your care team members not to enter this information into your medical record.

Members of your care team may not always know what terms you prefer to use. If your care team members don’t ask which pronouns you would like them to use, let them know how you describe yourself. If you give your care team permission, they will include this information in your medical record so that others involved in your care will use the name and pronouns you prefer.

There are several ways to find a care team you connect with. To start, you can talk to friends or use the resources in this brochure. Finding a care team you are comfortable with is essential to your health and wellness.

There are many resources for LGBTQ patients seeking medical care and advice. Here are a few you may be interested in.

Want more information about LGBTQ healthcare?

The National LGBT Health Education Center has publications and resources for patients and providers: lgbthealtheducation.org.

Want more information about transgender health?

The Center of Excellence for Transgender Health has many resources: transhealth.ucsf.edu.

Want information about health care organizations that demonstrate a commitment to LGBTQ health care?

The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) publishes a Health Equality Index yearly: hrc.org/hei.

Want to find LGBTQ affirming physicians and clinicians?

Use the “Find a provider” tool on the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association and World Professional Association for Transgender Health sites: glma.org and wpath.org.

Want additional support for your friends or family?

PFLAG, a national organization that unites people who are LGBTQ with families, friends and allies, publishes lists of organizations it partners with and local groups for support, education and advocacy: pflag.org

Here are websites LGBTQ youth can visit to find healthcare or get more information.

Questions about your sexual health?

Visit Advocates for Youth: advocatesforyouth.org

Want support for your friends or family?

Visit the TransYouth Family Allies at imatyfa.org or PFLAG for lists of organizations and local support groups pflag.org.

Want to help make changes at school?

Find resources at GSA Network gsanetwork.org or Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network glsen.org.

Want a safe place to call for information, referrals and support?

Try the Peer Listening Line, 617-267-2535 (toll free 800-399-PEER) or the GLBT National Help Center’s Youth Talkline at 800-246-PRIDE (7743).

Have you experienced violence or sexual assault?

Contact the Safe Homes Project at 800-621-HOPE (4673) or Llámanos Sexual Assault Hotline at 800-223-5001.

Have you run away from home or are you homeless?

Call the National Runaway Safeline for help at 800-786-2929, or visit 1800runaway.org.

Are you feeling sad or thinking about hurting yourself?

Call the Trevor Project’s Lifeline, 866-488-7386, or visit thetrevorproject.org.

Want to find LGBTQ affirming physicians and clinicians?

Use the “Find a provider” tool on the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association and World Professional Association for Transgender Health sites: glma.org and wpath.org.

Want additional support for your friends or family?

PFLAG, a national organization that unites people who are LGBTQ with families, friends and allies, publishes lists of organizations it partners with and local groups for support, education and advocacy: pflag.org.

The better we know you, the better we can care for you. Your health is important. Being open with your care team about your life is crucial to staying healthy, and coming out to your care team is an important step. Many people are not aware that members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) community face unique health risks, such as higher smoking rates, a greater risk of suicide attempts and a higher chance of getting certain sexually transmitted diseases. Talking with your care team can help you overcome these issues and access the care you need most. Being open about your sexual orientation, sexual behavior and gender identity not only helps your care team, it helps you!

Being open with your care team means they can:

  • Offer care that is personalized and relevant to you.
  • Offer referrals to specialists like behavioral health and other wellness experts who can meet your specific needs.
  • Be sensitive to current health trends that affect the LGBTQ community.
  • Provide you with comprehensive care that supports your mind, body and spirit.

Our mission is to improve the health of our communities, one person at a time. Every detail of who you are matters to your health, and we want to know all about it so we can provide the best care for YOU.

Members of the LGBTQ community often experience prejudice, stereotyping, and harassment or bullying. This kind of discrimination can be very stressful, which can put you at risk for depression, anxiety, substance abuse, feelings of loneliness and even suicide. Being open, not only about your sexual orientation and gender identity, but about any substance use or mental health needs, allows your care team to give you the best possible care.

Exercise and healthy eating are important components of wellness for everyone. Physical health plays an important role in feeling emotionally healthy, too! Research has shown that LGBTQ community members are more likely to smoke, lesbians are at higher risk for obesity and some gay men struggle with poor body image. If you discuss these issues with your care team, they can advise you on healthy diets and self-image, smoking cessation and exercise routines.

Lesbians, bisexual women and some transgender people should also make sure they are getting routine gynecologic screenings, including Pap smears, and routine breast cancer screening.

Sometimes talking to your care team about your sexual health can feel difficult. However, there are many benefits to discussing your sexual function and behaviors with your doctor and others involved in your care. Each person’s needs will differ, but some of the sexual health issues that may be important to discuss are:

  • Screening for STDs and HIV prevention therapy (HIV PrEP)
  • Getting vaccinated for HPV and hepatitis A and B
  • Using condoms or other barrier methods
  • Safer sex education and counseling
  • Problems with sexual function or satisfaction
  • Plans to adopt or conceive children

As a member of the LGBTQ community, you should feel comfortable talking to care team members about family life issues, such as partner abuse (feeling safe at home) and living wills.

All are welcome here


At Novant Health, diversity and inclusion are part of our core values. We care about you, your family’s health and providing our communities with the services needed to stay healthy. Our mission is to improve the health of our communities, one person at a time. Every detail of who you are matters to your health, and we want to know all about it so we can provide the best care for YOU.