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Tests & Procedures : Lab Tests

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    • 24-Hour Urine Protein

      This test measures the amount of protein in your urine. When protein shows up in your urine, you may have kidney disease, diabetes, or another condition.

    • 5-Hydroxindoleacetic Acid (Urine)

      This test measures the amount of 5-hydroindoleacetic acid in your urine. The test can help find out if you have a carcinoid tumor.

    • A1C

      A1C is a blood test used to screen people to find out whether they have diabetes or prediabetes.

    • Acetaminophen Drug Level

      The acetaminophen drug level is a blood test used to screen for the presence of the common pain reliever acetaminophen.

    • Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody (Blood)

      This test measures the concentration of an antibody in your blood that may mean you have the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis.

    • Acid-Fast Bacteria Culture

      This test is done to find out if you have tuberculosis. Your doctor might order this test if you have a lung infection or symptoms of TB.

    • Acid-Fast Bacteria Smear

      This test looks for a type of bacteria called acid-fast bacillus in your sputum. Tuberculosis is the most common infection from this type of bacteria.

    • ACTH (Blood)

      This blood test measures the amount of adrenocorticotripic hormone (ACTH) the pituitary gland produces.

    • Activated Coagulation Time

      ACT is a blood test that measures how long it takes your blood to clot.

    • Activated Partial Thromboplastin Clotting Time

      This test clocks the amount of time it takes for your blood to form a clot. You may need this test if your doctor suspects that you have a bleeding disorder.

    • Adult Lead (Blood)

      This test measures the levels of lead in your blood. You may be exposed to lead on your job or through lead-based paint used in your home.

    • Albumin (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of the protein albumin in your blood. The test can help diagnose liver and kidney problems.

    • Albumin (Urine)

      This test looks for a protein called albumin in your urine. The test is used to check for kidney damage or disease.

    • Aldosterone and Renin

      This blood test measures levels of aldosterone and renin.

    • Alkaline Phosphatase

      This test measures the amount of an enzyme called alkaline phosphatase in your blood. It can help your doctor diagnose certain liver conditions.

    • Alpha-1 Antitrypsin

      This test checks to see if a liver disorder or lung disease is caused by a genetic disorder call alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    • Alpha-Fetoprotein (Amniotic Fluid)

      This test checks a sample of amniotic fluid to confirm a suspected birth defect called an open neural tube defect in your fetus. Spina bifida is an example of a neural tube defect.

    • Alpha-Fetoprotein (Blood)

      If you are pregnant, this test looks for a fetal substance called alpha-fetoprotein in your blood. Higher levels of AFP may mean your fetus has a birth defect.

    • Alpha-Fetoprotein Tumor Marker (Blood)

      This test looks for a protein in your blood that may mean that you have liver cancer or one of several other cancers.

    • ALT

      This test measures the amount of a certain enzyme in your blood. High levels are a sign of liver damage.

    • Ammonia

      This test checks the amount of ammonia in your blood. Ammonia may build up in your body if you have kidney or liver failure.

    • Amphetamine Screen (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of a drug called amphetamine in your blood. The test is most commonly used to screen for drug abuse.

    • Amphetamine Screen (Urine)

      This test detects the presence of amphetamine in your urine. This drug can show up in your urine long after you've taken it.

    • Amylase (Blood)

      This test measures the level of the enzyme amylase in your blood. Amylase levels in your blood rise when your pancreas or your salivary glands are inflamed.

    • Amylase (Urine)

      This test is used to find out whether you have pancreatitis or another pancreas-related disorder.

    • Anaerobic Culture

      This test looks for certain bacteria in a wound or an infection in a fluid sample. These bacteria are called anaerobic because they don’t need oxygen to grow.

    • Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (Blood)

      This test measures the level of a certain enzyme in your blood. It can help diagnose a condition called sarcoidosis.

    • Anion Gap (Blood)

      This test looks at electrically charged particles in your blood to help your doctor diagnose acid-base imbalances.

    • Antidiuretic Hormone

      This test measures the amount of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) in your blood. ADH regulates your body's balance of water.

    • Antimitochondrial Antibody and Antimitochondrial M2 Antibody

      This test looks for certain substances in your blood that may mean you have a form of liver disease.

    • Antimyocardial Antibody

      This test checks the level of a certain antibody in your blood that can indicate heart damage. The antibodies show up before symptoms appear.

    • Antinuclear Antibody

      This blood test is done to help your doctor diagnose a type of illness called an autoimmune disease.

    • Antiphospholipid Antibody

      This test checks for antibodies that may can help diagnose a condition with abnormal blood clots or an autoimmune disease.

    • Antithrombin (Activity and Antigen)

      The antithrombin activity and antigen tests are used to help find out what may be causing abnormal blood clots in your body.

    • Antitissue Transglutaminase Antibody

      This test screens for celiac disease and also helps your doctor monitor your condition if you have this disease.

    • Apolipoprotein A

      This test measures the amount of a protein in your blood related to LDL and HDL cholesterol. It can help predict your risk for heart disease.

    • Apolipoprotein B100

      This test measures the amount of a certain type of cholesterol in your blood. The test helps your doctor figure out your risk for cardiovascular disease, a disease affecting your heart and blood vessels.

    • Arterial Blood Gas (ABG)

      An arterial blood gas analysis measures the balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your blood to see how well your lungs are working.

    • Aspartate Transaminase

      This test is used to diagnose liver damage. AST is an enzyme that is found in your blood when your liver or muscles are damaged.

    • Bartonella Antibody

      This blood test screens for exposure to Bartonella henselae, the bacteria that causes cat scratch disease.

    • Basic Metabolic Panel (Blood)

      This blood test gives information about your body’s metabolism. It gives a snapshot of the health of your kidneys, your blood sugar levels, and the levels of key electrolytes, such as potassium and sodium.

    • Bence-Jones Protein (Urine)

      This urine test is used mainly to diagnose and monitor multiple myeloma, a blood cancer.

    • Benzodiazepines (Blood)

      This is a blood test to screen for a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. These are depressant drugs used to help patients sleep and ease anxiety.

    • Benzodiazepines (Urine)

      This is a urine test to screen for a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. These drugs are often informally called tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and muscle relaxants.

    • Beta Hemolytic Streptococcus Culture (Genital, Urine)

      This test looks for group B streptococcus (GBS) bacteria in a culture sample either from your urine or from secretions in your vagina and rectum.

    • Beta Hemolytic Streptococcus Culture (Throat)

      This test looks for the bacteria that cause strep throat. This condition causes a severe sore throat and makes it painful to swallow.

    • Bicarbonate

      This test measures the amount of bicarbonate, a form of carbon dioxide, in your blood.

    • Bilirubin (Amniotic Fluid)

      This test is done to see how well your baby is developing inside you.

    • Blood Culture

      This is a blood test checks for infection in your blood.

    • Blood Smear

      This test looks at the number and shape of your red and white blood cells and platelets to see whether they are normal.

    • Blood Type and Crossmatch

      This is a set of tests that looks for harmful interactions between your blood and donor blood. The tests are done before a blood transfusion.

    • Blood Urea Nitrogen

      This test measures the amount of urea nitrogen in your blood. It can help your doctor find out if you have kidney disease or another kidney disorder.

    • BNP (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of a protein that builds up in your blood when you have heart failure. It's an important tool for doctors to diagnose heart failure quickly.

    • Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

      This is a two-part test that looks at the blood cells in a sample of bone marrow, the spongy tissue within certain bones. This test may help your doctor diagnose or monitor a blood disease or health condition affecting your marrow.

    • Bordetella Pertussis Antibody (Blood)

      This test checks for Bordetella pertussis antibodies in your blood. B. pertussis are the bacteria that cause pertussis, or whooping cough.

    • Borrelia Antibody (Blood)

      This test measures the level of Borrelia antibodies in your blood. Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria cause Lyme disease.

    • Borrelia Antibody (CSF)

      This test looks for Borrelia antibodies in your cerebrospinal fluid. Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria cause Lyme disease.

    • BRCA

      This blood test checks for mutations for the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genes which can increase the risk for breast and ovarian cancer.

    • Brucella Antibody

      This test looks for brucellosis, an infectious disease usually caused by handling animals or milk products infected with the brucella bacteria.

    • Brucella Antibody (CSF)

      This test looks at fluid from your spinal cord to find out if you have an illness called brucellosis.

    • CA 125

      This test looks for the protein CA 125 in your blood. CA 125 is higher in many women with ovarian cancer.

    • CA 15-3

      CA 15-3 is a blood test used to monitor certain types of cancer.

    • CA 19-9

      This test looks for the antigen called CA 19-9 in your blood. It may help diagnose pancreatic cancer and other types of cancer.

    • CA 27-29

      This blood test is used to monitor breast cancer and to find out whether it might recur. It is not a screening test.

    • Calcitonin

      This blood test measures the level of calcitonin in your blood. Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by your thyroid.

    • Calcium (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of calcium in your blood. It can be used to diagnose a variety of disorders, from kidney disease to parathyroid problems.

    • Calcium (Urine)

      This test measures the level of calcium in your urine. If too much calcium builds up in your urine, you may be at risk for kidney stones.

    • Campylobacter Culture (Stool)

      This test looks for harmful bacteria called Campylobacter in a culture sample from your stool.

    • Cannabinoid Screen and Confirmation (Urine)

      This is a two-part test to look for THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, in your urine. It's considered quite accurate.

    • Carbon Dioxide (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of carbon dioxide in your blood. Normally, carbon dioxide in your bloodstream causes no problems, but if you have far too much or too little of it, you may have a disease or a medical emergency.

    • Carbon Monoxide (Blood)

      This test measures the level of carbon monoxide in your blood. You may need this test if you have smoke inhalation or symptoms of CO poisoning.

    • Carcinoembryonic Antigen

      This test measures a protein called carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in your blood. This protein is present on some types of cancer cells.

    • Cardiac Biomarkers (Blood)

      This test measures the levels of cardiac biomarkers – enzymes, hormones, and proteins – in your blood. Some of these markers increase after you've had a heart attack.

    • Cardiolipin Antibody

      This test helps your doctor diagnose clotting disorders and autoimmune diseases. It measures the concentration of antibodies related to a fat molecule in your blood.

    • Catecholamines (Blood)

      This test measures the levels of catecholamines in your blood. The catecholamine hormones are epinephrine, also called adrenaline; norepinephrine; and dopamine.

    • Catecholamines (Urine)

      This test measures the levels of catecholamines in your urine. The test may help find out whether you have a rare type of tumor.

    • CCP

      This blood test checks for the amino acid citrulline, a marker for rheumatoid arthritis.

    • CD4-CD8 Ratio

      This test looks at the ratio of two important types of white blood cells in your blood. If you have HIV, the results can help your doctor know how strong your immune system is.

    • Ceruloplasmin (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of copper-containing protein in the blood. It can help diagnose copper disorders like Wilson's disease.

    • Chlamydia Pneumoniae (Swab)

      If your health care provider suspects that you have this type of pneumonia, he or she may do a swab test of your nose or throat.

    • Chlamydia Trachomatis (Swab)

      This test looks for bacteria that cause chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S.

    • Chlamydia Trachomatis (Urine)

      This test looks for the bacteria that cause chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S.

    • Chloride

      This test will find out how much chloride is in your blood and help your doctor find out if you have a kidney problem.

    • Chloride (Urine)

      This test measures the amount of chloride in your urine. Knowing your chloride level is useful if you have a condition called metabolic alkalosis.

    • Cholesterol

      This test measures the amount of cholesterol in your blood to help determine your risk for heart disease.

    • Cholinesterase (Blood)

      This test looks for toxic chemicals in your blood. These chemicals are most often found in insecticides, either those use in fields or those used in bug sprays.

    • Chromosome Analysis

      This test looks for changes, or abnormalities, in the chromosomes that make up your body’s DNA, or genetic road map.

    • Clinical Genetic Testing

      This screening test looks for inherited diseases or genes that put you at risk for a certain disease.

    • Clonazepam Drug Level (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of clonazepam in your blood. Clonazepam is a drug used to treat seizures.

    • Clostridium Difficile Toxin (Stool)

      This test looks at your stool for toxins that may be causing persistent diarrhea.

    • Cocaine Screen

      A cocaine screen is a test done to find out whether you have used cocaine recently. The test can be done on your urine, saliva, blood, hair, or sweat.

    • Complement C3 (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of C3 proteins in your blood. C3 proteins are part of your immune system. This test can help diagnose lupus.

    • Complement C4 (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of a protein called C4 in your blood. You may need this test if your doctor suspects that you have an autoimmune disease.

    • Complete Blood Count

      This test looks at the number and size of various blood cells to help judge your overall health or to diagnose a range of illnesses, from anemia to infections.

    • Complete Blood Count with Differential

      This panel of tests looks for many illnesses, including anemia, infections, and leukemia, in your blood. It can help see how your overall health is.

    • Complete Urinalysis

      This test looks at a sample of your urine, to help diagnose, find, or track many conditions, such as diabetes or urinary tract infections.

    • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

      This test is a screening panel of 14 tests that look at your metabolism. The tests help see how well your liver and kidneys are working.

    • Cortisol (Blood)

      This test may help in the diagnosis of two fairly uncommon medical conditions: Cushing’s syndrome and Addison’s disease. The test also screens for other diseases that affect your pituitary and adrenal glands.

    • Cortisol (Urine)

      This test looks for two rare medical conditions: Cushing's syndrome and Addison's disease, as well as other diseases that affect your pituitary and adrenal glands.

    • C-Peptide (Blood)

      This blood test is used to evaluate your body's production of insulin. It's used to help diagnose blood sugar disorders such as diabetes.

    • C-Peptide (Urine)

      This test measures how much insulin your body produces. This is important if you have hypoglycemia or other issues related to diabetes.

    • C-Reactive Protein (Blood)

      This test is used to find out if you have inflammation in your body. The test detects the amount of a protein made by your liver and released into your bloodstream.

    • Creatine Kinase (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of a protein called creatine kinase (CK) in your blood. Levels of CK can rise after a heart attack or skeletal muscle injury.

    • Creatine Kinase MB (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of the enzyme creatine kinase in your blood. A certain form of this enzyme can help find out whether you're having a heart attack.

    • Creatine Kinase MB/Creatine Kinase Ratio

      This test measures the amount of creatine kinase (CK), an enzyme, in your blood. The test can help your doctor find out whether you're having a heart attack.

    • Creatine Kinase with Isoenzymes (Blood)

      This test is used to find out whether you have muscle damage, including damage to your heart muscle.

    • Creatinine (Blood)

      This test checks to see how well your kidneys are working. Creatinine is a normal waste product. If it builds up in your body, it could be a sign of kidney disease.

    • Creatinine (Urine)

      This test measures the level of a substance called creatinine in your urine. Too much creatinine may be a sign of kidney disease.

    • Creatinine Clearance

      This test looks at how well your kidneys are working and how well blood is flowing to them.

    • Cryofibrinogen

      This test looks for abnormal proteins in your blood plasma. These abnormal proteins may mean you have a life-threatening disease called cryofibrinogenemia.

    • Cryoglobulin

      This test is done to find out if you have abnormal proteins in your blood. They can be a sign of rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, or Raynaud's syndrome, among other illnesses.

    • Cystatin C

      This test measures the amount of a protein called cystatin C in your blood. This is a relatively new blood test to look at your kidney health.

    • Cystic Fibrosis Genetic Carrier Testing

      This test is done to see if you carry a defective gene that may cause cystic fibrosis in your child.

    • Cystic Fibrosis Sweat Test

      A chloride sweat test is the gold standard test for diagnosing cystic fibrosis, a disease that causes mucus to build up in the lungs and other organs.

    • Cytomegalovirus (Amniotic Fluid)

      This test checks a developing baby for cytomegalovirus (CMV), a virus that belongs to the herpes family of viruses.

    • Cytomegalovirus (Blood)

      This test looks for antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV), a virus in the herpes family, in your blood.

    • Cytomegalovirus (Urine)

      This test looks for cytomegalovirus, a common virus that belongs to the herpes family. Your doctor might order the test if you have unexplained symptoms that resemble the flu.

    • D-Dimer

      This test is used to rule out whether you have a blood clot. When blood clots form and start to break down, they release the substance D-dimer into the blood.

    • Deamidated Gliadin Antibody

      This test helps your doctor find out whether you have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder.

    • Dehydroepiandrosterone and Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate

      This test measures the level of DHEA and DHEA-S in your blood. It may also be used to check how well your adrenal glands are working.

    • Diabetes Autoantibody Panel

      This blood test checks for substances called antibodies, which are produced in response to insulin and other chemicals related to insulin. It is used to determine whether a person has type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

    • Digoxin Drug Level

      This test measures the amount of the heart drug digoxin in your blood. When you take digoxin, it’s important that the drug be at the right level for you to benefit from it.

    • Diphtheria Antitoxoid Antibody

      This test measures the level of diphtheria antibodies in your blood. Diphtheria is extremely rare in the U.S., but you may be at risk if you have traveled to an area where the disease is common.

    • Direct Antiglobulin

      The direct antiglobulin test, or direct Coombs test, is a blood test used to diagnose a type of anemia caused by your immune system.

    • Direct Bilirubin

      This test looks for bilirubin in your blood or urine. The test is usually done to look for liver problems, such as hepatitis, or blockages, such as gallstones.

    • EBV Antibody

      This test checks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. It often doesn't have any symptoms, but in teens and young adults, it can mononucleosis.

    • Electrolytes

      This test measures the main electrolytes in your body: sodium, chloride, potassium, and carbon dioxide.

    • Endomysial Antibody

      This test looks for certain antibodies in your blood that may mean you have celiac disease, an autoimmune disease that affects your intestines.

    • Entamoeba histolytica Antibody

      This test looks for antibodies to a parasite that causes the disease amebiasis. This disease is more common in tropical countries with poor sanitation.

    • Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate

      This test measures how quickly your red blood cells settle to the bottom of a test tube. The faster they settle, the more likely you have inflammation.

    • Erythropoietin (Blood)

      This test measures how much of the hormone erythropoietin you have in your blood. You may need this test to help find out what kind of anemia you have.

    • Estradiol (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of estradiol (E2), the form of estrogen made primarily by the ovaries.

    • Ethanol (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of alcohol, or ethanol, in your blood. This test is used by law enforcement agencies and hospitals to find out the concentration of alcohol in a person’s blood.

    • Factor I

      This test measures the amount of a protein called factor I, or fibrinogen, in your blood. It helps find out if you have a bleeding or clotting disorder.

    • Factor II

      This test measures how much of the protein prothrombin, or factor II, is in your blood. It can help diagnose bleeding and clotting disorders.

    • Factor IX (Antihemophilic Factor B)

      The factor IX test is part of a larger screening to find out which type of hemophilia you have.

    • Factor V

      This test looks for a deficiency in a protein called factor V. This protein is one of your body's "clotting factors." When you have too little factor V, you may have bleeding problems.

    • Factor VIII (Antihemophilic Factor A)

      This test helps find out whether you have hemophilia A or another clotting disorder.

    • Factor X

      This test checks for a deficiency in a protein in the blood known as Factor X. This protein helps with clotting.

    • Factor XI

      This test measures the amount of factor XI in your blood. Factor XI is a substance that plays an important role in blood clotting.

    • Factor XII

      This test measures the amount of a protein called coagulation factor XII in your blood. Factor XII is one of several clotting factors.

    • Fecal Fat

      This test measures the amount of fat in your stool. Having too much fat in your stool may mean that you have malabsorption.

    • Fecal Occult Blood Test

      A fecal occult blood test checks a stool sample for blood that can't be seen with the naked eye. Blood in the stool is a sign of bleeding in the digestive tract.

    • Ferritin (Blood)

      This test measures how much iron is in your blood. Too much or too little iron can cause health problems.

    • Fetal Fibronectin

      This test measures the amount of a protein made during pregnancy. It can help your doctor know if you are at risk for premature delivery.

    • Fluphenazine Drug Level (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of fluphenazine in your blood. The medication is used to treat schizophrenia and Tourette's syndrome.

    • Folate

      This test measures the amount of folate in either your serum or your red blood cells.

    • Follicle-Stimulating Hormone

      This test measures the level of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), an important hormone made in your pituitary gland.

    • Fragile X Syndrome (Amniotic Fluid)

      This test checks a sample of your amniotic fluid to find out whether your fetus may have fragile X syndrome, a rare genetic disorder.

    • Free and Bound T4

      This is a blood test to measure your level of the hormone thyroxine, or T4. This test can show your doctor whether your thyroid gland is overactive, a condition called hyperthyroidism, or underactive, a condition called hypothyroidism.

    • Free and Bound Triiodothyronine (Blood)

      This test measures the level of triiodothyronine (T3) in your blood. T3 is a type of hormone made by your thyroid gland.

    • Free Androgen Index

      This test is used to find out whether your levels of the hormone androgen are normal. The levels are different for men and women.

    • Free Light Chains (Blood)

      This test looks for signs of antibodies called immunoglobulins in your blood. It can help diagnose an illness called multiple myeloma.

    • Free T4

      This test measures the level of free T4 in your blood. It helps your doctor know how well your thyroid is working.

    • Free Testosterone

      This test measures both your total and free testosterone levels. Having levels that are too high or too low can cause health problems.

    • Galactosemia

      This test looks for enzyme activity in the red blood cells in your child’s blood. It can help diagnose galactosemia, a rare inherited disorder.

    • Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase

      This test looks for an enzyme called gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in your blood. The test can help find out whether you have liver damage.

    • Gastrin

      This test measures the amount of the hormone gastrin in your blood. You may need this test if you have recurrent peptic ulcers.

    • Gene Mutation for Cystic Fibrosis in Newborns (Blood)

      This test looks for cystic fibrosis in newborn babies. People with CF tend to develop chronic lung disease and are at risk for lung infections.

    • Giardia Antigen (Stool)

      This is a stool sample test to look for the parasite Giardia intestinalis, which causes an infection of the small bowel called giardiasis or travelers’ diarrhea.

    • Glomerular Filtration Rate

      This test looks for changes in how well your kidneys are working. This is especially important if you have diabetes or high blood pressure.

    • Glucose (Blood)

      A blood glucose test tells you whether your level of glucose is within a healthy range. Fasting plasma glucose is a common test for diagnosing diabetes.

    • Glucose (CSF)

      This test measures the amount of glucose in the fluid that surrounds your brain and spinal cord. If you have a serious infection, your glucose level may be lower than normal.

    • Glucose (Urine)

      This test is used to indirectly find out if your levels of glucose – blood sugar – are within a healthy range. It's used to monitor both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    • Glucose Tolerance

      This test is used to screen for prediabetes or diabetes. For the test, you drink a sweet beverage and then have your blood drawn several times over the next few hours.

    • Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase

      This test finds out whether you have low levels of a particular enzyme that can cause hemolytic anemia.

    • Gonorrhea (Urine)

      This test looks at your urine to find out whether you are infected with gonorrhea, a common sexually transmitted disease.

    • Gonorrhea Culture (Discharge)

      This test looks for the bacteria that cause gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease.

    • Gonorrhea Culture (DNA Probe)

      This test looks for DNA of gonorrhea bacteria in a sample of bodily fluid. It can distinguish between an infection caused by gonorrhea and one caused by chlamydia.

    • Gram Stain

      This test finds out whether you have a bacterial infection. The test can be used on various bodily fluids, such as blood and urine.

    • Growth Hormone (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of growth hormone in your blood. This hormone affects height, bone, and muscle growth in children. It affects how adults feel and look, as well as their bone and muscle health.

    • Growth Hormone Antibody

      This test looks for growth hormone (GH) antibodies in your blood. These antibodies may mean that your growth treatment may not be working.

    • Growth Hormone with Stimulation (Blood)

      This test measures the level of growth hormone in your blood by stimulating hormone production.

    • Growth Hormone with Suppression (Blood)

      This test measures the level of growth hormone in your blood. Too much of this hormone may mean you have a tumor in your pituitary gland.

    • Haemophilus Influenzae Antibody

      This test measures the amount of anti-Hib IgG iantibody in your blood. The test can find out how well your body has responded to the Hib vaccine.

    • Haptoglobin

      This test measures the level of a protein called haptoglobin in your blood. Low levels may mean that you have a type of anemia.

    • HCG (Blood)

      This test is the gold standard for determining whether you are pregnant. It shows that you are pregnant before an imaging test, such as an ultrasound, can do so.

    • HCG (Urine)

      This test measures the amount of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) in your urine. It can tell whether you are pregnant within days of a missed period.

    • HDL Cholesterol

      This test measures the amount of HDL ("good") cholesterol in your blood. It's one of several tests that can determine your risk for heart disease.

    • Helicobacter Pylori Antibody

      This test measures the levels of Helicobacter pylori antibodies in your blood. The test can help find out whether your peptic ulcers are caused by these bacteria.

    • Helicobacter Pylori Culture

      This test is used to find out if you are infected with Helicobacter pylori bacteria.

    • Helicobacter Pylori Urea Breath

      This is a breath test that checks for H. pylori, a common infection that can cause ulcers and other stomach irritations.

    • Hematocrit

      This test measures how much of your blood is made up of red blood cells. Too many or too few red blood cells can cause health problems.

    • Hemoglobin

      This is a blood test to find out how much hemoglobin is in your blood. You may need this test if you have anemia or symptoms of anemia.

    • Hemoglobin (Fetal)

      Fetal hemoglobin is one of many types of hemoglobin in the blood. High levels may mean you have thalassemia, myeloid leukemia, or sickle cell anemia.

    • Hemoglobin C

      This test can find out whether you have hemoglobin C disease, a blood disorder. Hemoglobin C causes hemolytic anemia, which is similar to sickle cell disease.

    • Hemoglobin S

      This test looks for an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S in your blood. This type of hemoglobin can be a sign that you have sickle cell disease.

    • Hepatitis A Antibody

      This test finds out whether you are infected with the hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A is one of five hepatitis viruses, all of which can infect the liver.

    • Hepatitis B Core Antibody

      This test looks for antibodies called IgM in your blood. The test is used to find out whether you are actively infected with the hepatitis B virus.

    • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

      This test looks for hepatitis B surface antigens in your blood. The test is used to find out whether you have a recent or long-standing infection from the hepatitis B virus.

    • Hepatitis C Antibody

      This test determines whether you are infected with the hepatitis C virus, a virus that attacks the liver and can lead to liver disease.

    • Hepatitis Panel

      This test finds out whether you have a hepatitis infection. It looks for infection by one of several hepatitis viruses.

    • Herpes Simplex Virus Antibody

      This test screens for the herpes simplex virus and can help diagnose current and recurrent infections.

    • Herpes Simplex Virus Culture and Typing

      This test looks for which type of herpes simplex virus is causing your infection.

    • HIV Genotypic Resistance

      This blood test looks at the genetic makeup of a strain of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The test can be useful in planning your treatment for HIV.

    • HIV Viral Load

      This test measure the amount of HIV in your blood. HIV causes AIDS, and this test is used to see how well your HIV treatment is working.

    • HIV-1 Antibody

      The test looks for HIV-1 antibodies in your blood. Your body makes these antibodies when you have been exposed to HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

    • HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Screen

      This test looks for HIV infection in your blood or saliva. It can give you results in about 20 minutes.

    • HLA Antibody

      This test looks for a certain antibody made by your immune system. The test is done if you need an organ transplant.

    • HLA Antigen

      This test looks at the human leukocyte antigens (HLA) in your blood. It helps match donors and recipients for stem-cell and organ transplants.

    • HLA-B27 Antigen

      This test looks for a certain protein made by your immune system. The test can help tell whether you have an autoimmune disease.

    • Homocysteine

      This test measures levels of homocysteine in your blood. At high levels, it can damage the lining of arteries and encourage blood clotting.

    • HSV DNA (CSF)

      This test finds out if you have DNA from the herpes simplex virus in your nervous system. It can help diagnose encephalitis and meningitis.

    • Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

      This test looks for the virus that causes genital warts and cervical, throat, and anal cancer.

    • Immunofixation (Blood)

      This blood test finds out if you are abnormally making or losing protein or whether you are having problems absorbing protein.

    • Immunofixation and Protein Electrophoresis (CSF)

      This test looks for certain proteins in a sample of your cerebral spinal fluid. Having these proteins may be a sign of multiple sclerosis or other central nervous system disorder.

    • Immunofixation by Electrophoresis (Urine)

      This test separates and measures proteins in your urine. It looks for an abnormal protein called monoclonal protein, or M-protein.

    • Immunohistochemical Test for Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors

      This test looks for several types of receptors on cells in a sample of breast cancer tissue. It helps your doctor figure out which type of breast cancer you have.

    • Indirect Antiglobulin

      This blood test screens for antibodies in your blood.

    • Indirect Bilirubin

      This test measures the amount of bilirubin in your blood.

    • Insulin-Like Growth Factor

      This test measures the amount of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in your blood.

    • International Normalized Ratio

      This blood test looks to see how well your blood clots. The test is especially important if you take blood-thinning medications.

    • Intrinsic Factor Antibody

      This is a blood test for pernicious anemia, which is caused by a deficiency of vitamin B12.

    • Iron (Blood)

      This test measures the level of iron in your blood. Having too little or too much iron can lead to health problems.

    • Iron and Total Iron-Binding Capacity

      These tests measure the amount of iron in your blood and how well that iron moves through your body.

    • Ketone Bodies (Blood)

      This test measures ketones, a byproduct of digestion, in your blood. A high level of ketones is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes.

    • Ketone Bodies (Urine)

      This test checks the amount of ketones you have in your body. People with diabetes may have high levels of ketones.

    • Kidney Stone (Urine)

      This test checks your urine for chemicals that might cause your body to form kidney stones.

    • Lactate Dehydrogenase (CSF)

      This test measures the amount of an enzyme in your cerebrospinal fluid. The test can help diagnose diseases and conditions that affect your central nervous system.

    • Lactate Dehydrogenase Isoenzymes

      This test measures different enzymes in your blood. You may need this test if you've had a heart attack, or if you have a blood disorder or liver damage.

    • Lactic Acid Dehydrogenase (Blood)

      This test looks at how much of the enzyme LDH you have in your blood. Higher levels of this substance could mean you've had a heart attack or other tissue damage.

    • Lactose Tolerance (Blood)

      This test tells whether your body is able to break down lactose, a sugar found in milk and other dairy products. If you can't digest lactose, you have lactose intolerance.

    • Lactose Tolerance Hydrogen (Breath)

      This test measures the amount of hydrogen gas in your breath. It can help find out if you are unable to digest milk and other dairy products.

    • LDL Cholesterol

      This test measures the amount of LDL cholesterol in your blood. It may be done as part of a routine exam for high cholesterol.

    • Lead (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of lead in your child’s blood. High levels of lead in the blood can be toxic.

    • Lecithin-Sphingomyelin Ratio (Amniotic Fluid)

      This test measures two substances found in amniotic fluid near the end of pregnancy. The amounts can tell your doctor how mature your unborn baby's lungs are.

    • Legionella Antibody

      This test looks for an antibody that may be in your blood if you have Legionnaires’ disease. This disease is a type of pneumonia or serious lung infection.

    • Leptin (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of leptin in your blood. The test can help figure out how much body fat you have.

    • Lipase

      This test measures the amount of lipase in your blood. Lipase is an enzyme that is made by your pancreas. Higher levels may mean you have a problem with your pancreas.

    • Lipid Panel

      This group of tests measures the amount of cholesterol and other fats in your blood.

    • Lipid Panel with Non-HDL Cholesterol

      This test measures your level of LDL ("bad") cholesterol. The higher your LDL levels, the greater your risk for heart disease.

    • Lipid Panel with Total Cholesterol: HDL Ratio

      This group of tests measures the amount of cholesterol and triglycerides in your blood. This test looks at the ratio between total and HDL cholesterol levels.

    • Lipoprotein(a) Cholesterol

      This test measures the level of lipoprotein (a) in your blood. A high level of this cholesterol may mean you have heart disease or another cholesterol-related condition.

    • Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2

      This test looks for a specific lipoprotein, Lp-PLA2, in your blood. The test is used to help predict your risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke.

    • Lithium

      This test measures and monitors the amount of lithium in your blood. Lithium is a medication used to treat certain psychiatric illnesses.

    • Liver Kidney Microsomal Antibody

      This test looks for a certain type of antibody in your child’s blood. Having this antibody may mean that your child has liver damage caused by a form of hepatitis.

    • Liver Panel

      This group of tests measures specific proteins and enzymes in your blood. It can tell how healthy your liver is and help diagnose liver disease or damage.

    • Lupus Anticoagulant

      This is a specialized blood test to determine whether your body is producing certain antibodies or proteins that cause you to have a blood-clotting disorder.

    • Luteinizing Hormone (Blood)

      This test measures the level of luteinizing hormone in your blood. It can help figure out the cause of infertility or diagnose a pituitary disorder.

    • Magnesium (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of magnesium in your blood. Too little or too much of this mineral can mean you have certain health problems.

    • MDMA Drug Screen (Urine)

      This is a urine test to screen for MDMA, a street drug also known as Ecstasy.

    • Measles, Mumps, Rubella Antibody

      This test looks for antibodies to three diseases: measles, mumps, and rubella.

    • Mercury (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of mercury in your blood. You can be exposed to mercury from polluted air or water, if you work in an industry that still uses mercury, from eating fish that are high in mercury, and from some complementary and alternative health remedies.

    • Mercury (Urine)

      This test measures the amount of mercury in your urine. Long-term exposure to mercury can cause kidney and brain damage.

    • Metanephrine (Urine)

      This urine test measures the amount of metanephrines your body produces over a 24-hour period.

    • Metanephrines (Blood)

      This test measures the substances metanephrine and normetanephrine in your blood. It helps find out whether you have a tumor of the adrenal glands.

    • Methylmalonic Acid (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of a substance called methymalonic acid (MMA) in your blood. Higher levels may mean you have a vitamin B12 deficiency.

    • Methylmalonic Acid (Urine)

      This test measures the amount of a substance called methylmalonic acid (MMA) in your urine. It can help diagnose a B12 deficiency.

    • Microalbumin (Urine)

      This test looks for minuscule amounts of albumin in your urine. The test can find out whether diabetes has damaged your kidneys.

    • Microscopic Urinalysis

      This test looks at a sample of your urine under a microscope. It can see cells from your urinary tract, blood cells, crystals, bacteria, parasites, and cells from tumors.

    • Mononucleosis (Blood)

      This test looks for signs in your blood that you have the Epstein-Barr virus, the virus that causes mono.

    • MRSA Culture

      This test looks for bacteria called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a fluid sample from your body.

    • Mumps Antibody

      This test looks for antibodies to the mumps virus in your blood. Mumps is a contagious disease that usually begins with flu-like symptoms.

    • Mycoplasma (Genital)

      This test looks for microorganisms in a sample of secretions from your genital area. Mycoplasma may be a sign of infection or a sexually transmitted disease.

    • Mycoplasma (Sputum)

      This test looks at sputum, or the mucus from your lower airways. It finds out whether you have a lung infection caused by a certain organism.

    • Myoglobin (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of a protein called myoglobin in your blood. It’s done to help diagnose conditions caused by muscle damage, including heart attack.

    • Myoglobin (Urine)

      This test measures a protein called myoglobin in your urine. The test can help find out whether your muscle tissue has been injured.

    • Osmolality (Blood)

      This test measures the concentration of dissolved particles, or osmolality, in your blood.

    • Osmolality (Stool)

      This test measures the concentration, or osmolality, of certain particles in a sample of your watery stool. The test is used to find out why you have chronic diarrhea.

    • Osmolality (Urine)

      This test measures the concentration of particles in your urine. It finds out whether your electrolyte balance is normal and whether your kidneys are working properly.

    • Ova and Parasites (Stool)

      This test looks for parasites and their larvae or eggs in a sample of your stool.

    • Oxalate (Urine)

      This test checks for the chemical oxalate in your blood. High levels of this substance can make it more likely that you will develop kidney stones.

    • Pancreatic Polypeptide

      This test measures a substance in your blood called pancreatic polypeptide. Higher levels may mean you have a type of pancreatic tumor.

    • Pap

      This screening test looks for abnormal cells in the cervix. If abnormal cells are found, your doctor can treat them right away, before they become cancerous.

    • Parathyroid Hormone

      This test measures a substance called parathyroid hormone in your blood. This hormone is needed to help regulate the level of calcium in your blood.

    • Partial Thromboplastin Time

      This test is used to help diagnose bleeding problems and clotting disorders. It's often done before surgery to find out if you're at risk for uncontrolled bleeding.

    • Parvovirus

      This test checks for a current or past infection with the virus that causes fifth disease in children.

    • Phenobarbital

      This test measures the amount of the drug phenobarbital in your blood. Phenobarbital is used to treat epilepsy.

    • Phenylketonuria (PKU)

      This test checks newborns for PKU, a condition that can cause brain damage and severe intellectual disability if untreated.

    • Phenytoin

      This test monitors the level of the seizure medication phenytoin (Dilantin) in your blood.

    • Phosphorus

      This blood test checks the level of phosphorus in your body.

    • Plasmodium (Blood)

      This test looks for Plasmodium parasites in your blood. The parasites cause malaria, a serious disease that can be fatal if left untreated.

    • Platelet Antibody

      This test looks for platelet antibodies in your blood in order to find out the cause of a low platelet count.

    • Platelets

      This test measures the number of platelet cells in your blood. It can give your doctor valuable information about how well your blood clots to stop bleeding, how well your bone marrow is working, and about diseases that affect your platelet count.

    • Pneumocystis Jirovecii (Tissue, Fluid)

      This test looks for P. jirovecii fungus in your lung tissue or in fluid from a lung. This fungus causes pneumocystis pneumonia.

    • Porphyrins (Urine)

      This test looks for substances called porphyrins in your urine. If high levels are present, you may have a disease that affects the way the hemoglobin in your blood works.

    • Potassium

      This test measures the amount of potassium in your blood. It's often part of a routine blood test to check your level of electrolytes.

    • Prealbumin (Blood)

      The prealbumin screen is a blood test to see whether you are getting enough protein in your diet.

    • Progesterone

      This test measures the level of a hormone called progesterone in your blood. You may need this test if you are having trouble getting pregnant.

    • Proinsulin (Blood)

      This blood test measures proinsulin, a building block for insulin. Measuring proinsulin in your blood can help figure out your risk for type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

    • Prolactin (Blood)

      This test measures the level of prolactin in your blood. The test can help find out whether you have a pituitary gland tumor.

    • Prostate-Specific Antigen

      This test measures the level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in your blood. If your PSA levels start to rise, you may have prostate cancer.

    • Protein C (Blood)

      This test measures the level of protein C in your blood. If you have too little protein C, called a protein C deficiency, it means that your blood may clot too much.

    • Protein Electrophoresis (Blood)

      Protein electrophoresis is a test that measures specific proteins in the blood.

    • Protein S (Blood)

      This test measures levels of protein S, a protein in the blood that helps it to clot.

    • Prothrombin Time

      This test is one of several that looks at how well your blood clots. Your doctor may use this test to help diagnose a blood clotting disorder.

    • Protoporphyrin (Blood)

      The protoporphyrin test is used to diagnose blood abnormalities caused by lead. The test can indicate lead exposure or lead poisoning.

    • Quantitative Immunoglobulins

      This test measures the amount of antibodies called immunoglobulins in your blood. The test can tell whether you are lacking in one or more of these antibodies.

    • Quantitative Influenza Antibody (Nasal or Throat Swab)

      This test checks for influenza antibodies in a sample of secretions from your nose or throat.

    • Rapid Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

      This test looks at cells taken from fluid in your nose or throat to see if you have respiratory syncytial virus, which attacks the upper respiratory tract.

    • Rapid Influenza Antigen (Nasal or Throat Swab)

      This test is quickly checks for signs of the influenza virus in a sample of secretions from your nose or throat.

    • Rapid Plasma Reagin

      This test looks for signs of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease that can cause serious health problems if untreated.

    • Red Blood Cell Antibody

      This test looks for antibodies to red blood cells (RBCs) in your blood. These antibodies can cause problems during blood transfusions or, if you're pregnant, with your unborn baby.

    • Red Blood Cell Count

      A red blood cell (RBC) count is a blood test that measures the number of red blood cells, or erythrocytes, in your bloodstream.

    • Retic Count

      This test measures the number of reticulocytes in your blood. It can be used to diagnose anemia and find out why you have a disease.

    • Rh Typing

      Rh typing is very important during pregnancy. If you are Rh negative and your baby is Rh positive, you may have an Rh incompatibility.

    • Rheumatoid Factor (Blood)

      This test measures the level of a substance called rheumatoid factor in your blood. It helps your doctor find out whether you have rheumatoid arthritis.

    • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Blood)

      This blood test is used to look for antibodies that your body makes to fight Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a serious bacterial infection caused by a tick bite.

    • Rotavirus (Stool)

      This stool test is used to diagnose a rotavirus infection, which causes vomiting and diarrhea.

    • Rubella

      This test measures the amount of rubella antibodies in your blood. If you're pregnant, it's especially important to know if you have immunity against this virus.

    • Rubeola Antibody (Blood)

      This test finds out whether you have been exposed to the virus that causes measles, an extremely contagious disease.

    • Salicylate (Blood)

      This test looks for high levels of salicylate, the main ingredient in aspirin. It may be used to diagnose an aspirin overdose or to monitor people taking high doses for arthritis.

    • Salmonella Culture (Stool)

      This test looks for salmonella bacteria in your stool. Having these bacteria in your stool means you have a salmonella infection.

    • Semen Analysis

      This is a series of tests that looks at how healthy your semen and sperm are.

    • Serotonin

      This test is sometimes used to help diagnose carcinoid syndrome, a problem that can occur in people with carcinoid tumors.

    • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (Blood)

      This test measures the level of SHBG in your blood. It can help find out whether you have abnormal testosterone levels.

    • Sjogren's Antibody (Blood)

      This test checks for antibodies that are a sign of Sjögren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease that makes it hard for your glands to produce enough moisture.

    • Sodium (Blood)

      This test measures how much sodium you have in your blood. Too much or too little can lead to health problems like high blood pressure.

    • Sodium (Urine)

      This test measures the amount of sodium, or salt, in your urine. This test can help your doctor find out whether you have high blood pressure.

    • Sputum Culture

      This test finds out what's causing your lung infection. Sputum, or phlegm, is the mucus that settles in the lower airways of your lungs when you have an infection or a chronic illness.

    • Stool Culture

      This test looks for bacteria, viruses, and other organisms in your stool. This test can help find out what’s causing a digestive tract infection.

    • Strep Antistreptolysin O Titer (Blood)

      This test looks for antibodies that your body made when in fighting off group A Streptococcus bacteria. These bacteria cause strep throat.

    • Strep Screen (Rapid)

      This test looks for bacteria that cause strep throat and scarlet fever. Both of these illnesses are quite contagious.

    • T and B Lymphocyte and Natural Killer Cell Profile

      This test finds and counts three types of white blood cells in your blood. White blood cells help your body fight off infections and illness.

    • Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase

      This test looks for a substance that can appear in your blood if you have hairy cell leukemia.

    • Tay-Sachs Disease

      This test looks for specific genetic changes in a sample of your blood. These genetic mutations cause most cases of Tay-Sachs disease.

    • TB Culture

      This test screens for tuberculosis by looking for the bacteria in the sputum, urine or cerebrospinal fluid.

    • TB Screening (Skin)

      This blood tests helps determine whether you have been infected with tuberculosis (TB).

    • TB Screening (Whole Blood)

      This blood test is done to find out if you have been infected with tuberculosis (TB).

    • Tegretol (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of the drug carbamazepine in your blood. Carbamazepine is the generic name of a drug used to treat epilepsy, mania, bipolar disorder, and pain.

    • Tetanus Antibody

      This test looks for tetanus antibody in your blood. If you have been vaccinated for tetanus in the past, this test should show that you have enough antibodies against the disease.

    • Theophylline

      This test measures the level of the medication theophylline in your blood. Having too much of this drug in your body can be life-threatening.

    • Thrombin Time

      Thrombin time is a measure of how long the blood's plasma, or the liquid portion of the blood, takes to form a clot.

    • Thyroid Antibody

      This test measures the amount of thyroid antibodies in your blood. The test can help find out whether you have a problem with your thyroid.

    • Thyroid Antithyroglobulin Antibody

      This test looks for antibodies made in response to a protein made by your thyroid. The test can help diagnose thyroid problems, including Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    • Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

      This test measures your level of TSH, a hormone made by your pituitary. You may need this test if you have symptoms of thyroid problems.

    • TORCH Panel

      The TORCH panel test is used to help diagnose infections that could harm the fetus during pregnancy.

    • Total and Free Carnitine

      This test measures the amount of a substance called carnitine in your blood. Carnitine makes it possible for your body to digest fatty acids.

    • Total and Free Insulin (Blood)

      This test measures two types of insulin in your body: total and free. The test can help diagnose low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia.

    • Total Bilirubin (Blood)

      This test is used to find out how well your liver is working. A small amount of bilirubin in your blood is normal. Too much may be a sign of liver disease.

    • Total Copper (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of copper in your blood. Too little or too much copper can cause health problems.

    • Total Protein and A/G Ratio

      This test measures the amount of protein in your blood. It can help your doctor find out if you have liver disease or nephrotic syndrome.

    • Total Testosterone

      This test measures the level of testosterone in your blood. Both men and women produce this hormone.

    • Toxoplasma Gondii (Amniotic Fluid)

      This test looks for a parasite that can infect an unborn child. A pregnant woman can pick up this parasite by eating undercooked meat, drinking contaminated water, or handling cat feces.

    • Toxoplasma Gondii Antibody

      This test looks for antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection in your blood.

    • Transferrin

      This test measures the amount of the protein transferrin in your blood. Levels of tranferrin tell your doctor about the iron supply in your body.

    • Trichomonas Vaginalis (Discharge)

      This test looks for a parasite that causes the sexually transmitted disease trichomoniasis. It can cause complications during pregnancy.

    • Tricyclic Antidepressant Screen

      This test is used to check a sample of blood or urine for tricyclic antidepressants. Although these drugs can be helpful in normal doses, taking too much can be fatal.

    • Triglycerides

      This test measures the amount of triglycerides in your blood. This test is part of a group of cholesterol and blood fat tests called a fasting lipoprotein panel, or lipid panel.

    • Troponin

      This test measures the amount of the protein troponin in your blood. It can tell your doctor whether you are having a heart attack.

    • Trypsin (Blood)

      This test measures levels of trypsin in your blood to see if you have pancreatitis.

    • Trypsin/Chymotrypsin (Stool)

      This test looks for two enzymes from the pancreas, to find out how well the pancreas is working. This test is used for people with cystic fibrosis.

    • Trypsinogen (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of trypsinogen in the blood. Trypsinogen is secreted by the pancrease to help with digestion.

    • Two-Hour Postprandial Glucose

      This blood test checks for diabetes. It is done after you eat a meal, so your doctor can see how your body responds to the sugar and starch in the food.

    • Uniparental Disomy

      This test is used to see if a child has certain chromosome changes.

    • Urea Nitrogen Clearance (Urine)

      This test measures the amount of urea nitrogen in your urine. The test can help diagnose kidney problems.

    • Uric Acid (Blood)

      This test measures the amount of uric acid in your blood. Too much uric acid can cause gout or kidney stones.

    • Uric Acid (Synovial Fluid)

      This test measures the amount of uric acid in the fluid of your joints. The test can help your doctor find out if you have gout, a type of arthritis.

    • Uric Acid (Urine)

      This test is used to find out whether you have gout. It can also be used to monitor you during cancer treatment and to check your urine after you've had a kidney stone.

    • Urine Cytology

      This test looks at a sample of your urine to see if it contains abnormal cells. The test is used to diagnose cancers of the urinary tract, including cancers of the kidney, bladder, ureter, and urethra.

    • Urine Protein (Dipstick)

      This test checks the amount of protein in your urine. Too much protein can be a sign of dehydration, kidney disease, or other health issues.

    • Varicella-Zoster Virus Antibody

      This test looks for antibodies in your blood that your body makes against the varicella-zoster virus. The virus causes chickenpox and shingles.

    • Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

      This test measures the amount of a substance in your body that helps new blood vessels form. The test can help monitor cancer treatment.

    • VDRL (CSF)

      This test looks for signs of neurosyphilis in your cerebrospinal fluid. Neurosyphilis happens when syphilis isn't treated and spreads to the spinal cord and brain.

    • Viral Culture

      This test checks to see whether an infection is caused by a bacterium or a virus. It can also tell which specific virus is causing your infection.

    • Vitamin B12 and Folate

      This test measures the levels of vitamin B12 and folate in your blood. You may have low B12 levels if you have pernicious anemia.

    • Vitamin D

      Vitamin D is especially important for bone health. If you have low levels of this vitamin, you may be at risk for osteoporosis or other bone problems.

    • VLDL Cholesterol

      This test measures the amount of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) in your blood.

    • Von Willebrand Panel

      This test is used to diagnose von Willebrand disease, a bleeding disorder that causes excessive bleeding after minor injuries.

    • West Nile Virus Antibody (Blood)

      This is a blood test that checks for West Nile virus, an infection that usually affects birds. It can be spread to people through the bite of an infected mosquito.

    • Western Equine Encephalitis

      This tests looks for the virus that causes Western equine encephalitis, an infection spread to people through bites from infected mosquitoes.

    • White Blood Cell (Stool)

      This test looks for white blood cells in your stool. This can help your doctor figure out what's causing inflammatory diarrhea.

    • White Cell Count

      This test measures the number of white blood cells in your blood. When you get sick, your white blood cell count is higher than normal because your body is releasing more of these cells to fight the infection.

    • Wound Culture

      This test looks for bacteria or other organisms in a wound. The test is used to find out if a wound is infected. It can also identify the type of organism that's causing the infection.

    • Yersinia (Stool)

      This test checks for an infection from the Yersinia bacteria. This infection is also called yersiniosis.